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Is there an easy way to take the dot product of one element of an array with every other? So given:

array([[1, 2, 3],
       [4, 5, 6],
       [7, 8, 9]])

I would like to get the result:

array([  32.,   50.,  122.])

I.e. a[0] dot a[1], a[0] dot a[2], a[1] dot a[2].

The array I am working with will NOT be square; that's just an example.

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
>>> X = scipy.matrix('1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9')
>>> X*X.T
matrix([[ 14,  32,  50],
        [ 32,  77, 122],
        [ 50, 122, 194]])

It gives you more than what you wanted, but it's undeniably easy.

Or

>>> X = scipy.array([[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]])
>>> scipy.dot(X, X.T)
array([[ 14,  32,  50],
       [ 32,  77, 122],
       [ 50, 122, 194]])
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If you wanted to extract just the elements of interest: np.dot(X, X.T)[np.triu_indices_from(X, k=1)]. –  Joe Kington Jan 17 '11 at 20:26
    
Thanks Joe, though the array I am working with will not be square. –  Christoph Jan 17 '11 at 22:40
1  
Note: triu_indices_from is new in Numpy v.1.4.0. Christoph: you can instead use triu_indices(len(X),k=1) because X*X.T is always square. –  Steve Tjoa Jan 17 '11 at 23:27

Since it looks like you are using numpy:

from itertools import combinations
import numpy as np

dot_products = [np.dot(*v) for v in combinations(vectors, 2)]

I checked this out and it appears to work on my python install.

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1  
Do you know how fast this is compared to a pure Numpy implementation? The array I will be using will have about 5000-10000 elements in it, so I need it to be quick. –  Christoph Jan 17 '11 at 22:45
1  
5k-10k elements is effectively nothing to a modern computer. –  Seth Johnson Jan 17 '11 at 22:53
1  
@Seth Johnson: In this case even 5k- 10k elements counts. There is way too much overhead to call separately np.dot for all of the combinations. np.dot can be utilized much more efficient way to calculate inner products between all combinations of vectors. Thanks –  eat Jan 30 '11 at 21:18

Here's another one:

>>> a = numpy.array([[1, 2, 3],
...        [4, 5, 6],
...        [7, 8, 9]])
>>> numpy.array([numpy.dot(a[i], a[j]) for i in range(len(a)) for j in range(i + 1, len(a))])
array([ 32,  50, 122])
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