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How can I create an operator function within a class that serves to typecast other types as an object of that class?

e.g.

class MyClass
{
  // ...
    // operator ??
  // ...
}

int main()
{
  MyClass obj;
  int Somevar;
  obj=(MyClass)Somevar; // class typecast
}

In general, is there an operator that allows this kind of typecast in exact syntax?

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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just add a constructor that takes one argument:

class MyClass {
    explicit MyClass(int x) { … }
};

called as:

MyClass x = static_cast<MyClass>(10); // or
MyClass y = MyClass(10); // or even
MyClass z(10);

This allows an explicit cast as in your example. (The C-style cast syntax is also supported but I won’t show it here because you should never use C-style casts. They are evil and unnecessary.)

Sometimes (but very rarely), an implicit cast is more appropriate (e.g. to convert from char* to std::string in assignments). In that case, remove the explicit qualifier in front of the constructor:

class MyClass {
   MyClass(int x) { … }
};

Now an implicit conversion from int is possible:

MyClass a = 10;

However, this is usually not a good idea because implicit conversions are non-intuitive and error-prone so you should normally mark the constructor as explicit.

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OP is using a cast. Implicit constructor isn't necessary. Explicit constructor would work just fine. The text of your answer implies that they need an implicit constructor. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 17 '11 at 21:08
    
@Noah: wow, hadn’t noticed. You’re of course right; I changed my answer. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 17 '11 at 21:28
    
+1 ............ –  Crazy Eddie Jan 17 '11 at 21:59
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Define a constructor taking int argument.

But implicit conversions has some problems, so many that the language has the keyword explicit to prohibit them.

Mainly that's about overload resolution.

So, perhaps think twice before allowing the implicit conversion.

Cheers & hth.,

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Provide non-explicit constructor with argument of wanted type:

class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass( int x );
...
};

MyClass a = 42;

Note though: this is usually a bad idea.

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You need to construct the object implicitly.

class MyClass
{
int x;
public:
  MyClass(int X = 0):x(X){}  //also serves a default constructor
}

int main()
{
  MyClass obj = Somevar; // implicit type construction
}
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why not use operator=() ?

class MyClass
{
public:
  Myclass& operator=()(int i) {
  //do what you want
  return *this;
  }
}

int main()
{
  MyClass obj;
  int Somevar;
  obj = Somevar; // call operator=(somevar)
}
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1  
Because you don't want to assign an existing object, you want to create a new one. And the implicit operator= works fine. –  GManNickG Jan 17 '11 at 21:09
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