Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's assume we have the following code:

 public class TestScope {
      private int a = 1;
         public static void main(String[] args) {
           TestScope ts = new TestScope();
           ts.a = 6;
           System.out.println(ts.a);
        }
    }

Why at line: ts.a = 6; I can get access to private variable a? I thought that private memebers cannot be accessed outside. I don't underestend this example.

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of Why can I access a private variable from main method ? –  cdhowie Jan 17 '11 at 23:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's because a and main(String[]) are both part of the definition of the class TestScope

Private means that a variable or method can only be accessed inside the class definition. The fact that a is an instance variable doesn't mean it can't be accessed by a static public method in the same class.

If the public static void main(String[]) was inside a different class, then it would not be able to access ts's a, because a is hidden from other classes.

share|improve this answer

Static methods are still considered part of the class they're declared in, and thus have access to private methods/fields.

If you had the main method (or any other static or instance method) in another class, you would indeed not be able to access a.

share|improve this answer
    
or more specificly, static methods defined inside a class are still considered part of that class. –  John Gardner Jan 17 '11 at 23:02
    
indeed, clarified my post. –  helloworld922 Jan 17 '11 at 23:03

A static method is considered 'part' of the class it's in and so has private-scope access to instances of it. This same question was tackled here a couple days ago.

share|improve this answer

You're not outside, you're in the same class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.