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I am a little confused with this matter. I am designing an ORM class that tries to behave very similarly to ActiveRecord in ruby on rails, but that's beside the point.

What I'm trying to say is that my class makes extensive use of static attribute inheritance, specially for database and table handling. My question is, should I use self:: at all?

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I think static is the wrong approach in the first place. It sounds like (and please correct if wrong) you just made your code untestable. –  PeeHaa Mar 7 '12 at 11:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You have to ask yourself: "Am I targeting the problem with the adequated approach?"

self:: and static:: do two different things. For instance self:: or __CLASS__ are references to the current class, so defined in certain scope it will NOT suffice the need of static calling on forward.

What will happen on inheritance?

class A {
    public static function className(){
        echo __CLASS__;
    }

    public static function test(){
        self::className();
    }
}

class B extends A{
    public static function className(){
        echo __CLASS__;
    }
}

B::test();

This will print

A

In the other hand with static:: It has the expected behaviour

class A {
    public static function className(){
        echo __CLASS__;
    }

    public static function test(){
        static::className();
    }
}

class B extends A{
    public static function className(){
        echo __CLASS__;
    }
}


B::test();

This will print

B

That is called late static binding in PHP 5.3.0. It solves the limitation of calling the class that was referenced at runtime.

With that in mind I think you can know see and solve the problem adequately. If you are inheriting several static members and need access to the parent and child members self:: will not suffice.

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5  
So basically if I want things to behave like usual, as in every other language, I should use static instead? And then when such things do not really matter I might as well use self for compatibility. Is that correct? –  elite5472 Jan 18 '11 at 16:19
6  
That's right, if you want backward compatibility you'll have to deal with self. If you want to access static members that way you'll have to do a static method that wraps the members. –  DarkThrone Jan 18 '11 at 16:27
    
alright, thanks for clearing things up for me. –  elite5472 Jan 18 '11 at 17:28
    
Thanks and +1. very helpfull –  DonSeba Nov 14 '12 at 20:39

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