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I have the following date in string format "2011-29-01 12:00 am" . Now I am trying to convert that to datetime format with the following code:

DateTime.TryParse(dateTime, out dt); 

But I am alwayws getting dt as {1/1/0001 12:00:00 AM} , Can you please tell me why ? and how can I convert that string to date.

EDIT: I just saw everybody mentioned to use format argument. I will mention now that I can't use the format parameter as I have some setting to select the custom dateformat what user wants, and based on that user is able to get the date in textbox in that format automatically via jQuery datepicker.

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3  
By the way, you can determine if the conversion failed by checking the return value of TryParse. That is bool success = DateTime.TryParse(...);. –  Jim Mischel Jan 18 '11 at 0:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 62 down vote accepted

This should work based on your example "2011-29-01 12:00 am"

DateTime dt;
DateTime.TryParseExact(dateTime, 
                       "yyyy-dd-MM hh:mm tt", 
                       CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, 
                       DateTimeStyles.None, 
                       out dt);
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5  
Beat me to it. If you know the format of your input string you should virtually always use TryParseExact/ParseExact methods. –  Euro Micelli Jan 17 '11 at 23:35
    
okay, so my date format is similar to the one in the example, but if the day or month value is single digit, then the DateTime parser will throw back an error, because its looked for two digits when there is only one. What would you suggest in this scenario? –  Ciaran Gallagher Nov 23 '12 at 20:49
6  
To answer my own question, in this case if you use a single character in the format, it works for both single and double character dates. e.g. d/m/yyyy works for 13/11/2012 –  Ciaran Gallagher Nov 23 '12 at 20:56

You need to use the ParseExact method. This takes a string as its second argument that specifies the format the datetime is in, for example:

// Parse date and time with custom specifier.
dateString = "2011-29-01 12:00 am";
format = "yyyy-dd-MM h:mm tt";
try
{
   result = DateTime.ParseExact(dateString, format, provider);
   Console.WriteLine("{0} converts to {1}.", dateString, result.ToString());
}
catch (FormatException)
{
   Console.WriteLine("{0} is not in the correct format.", dateString);
}
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That works:

DateTime dt = DateTime.ParseExact("2011-29-01 12:00 am", "yyyy-dd-MM hh:mm tt", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
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From DateTime on msdn...

Type: System.DateTime% When this method returns, contains the DateTime value equivalent to the date and time contained in s, if the conversion succeeded, or MinValue if the conversion failed. The conversion fails if the s parameter is null, is an empty string (""), or does not contain a valid string representation of a date and time. This parameter is passed uninitialized.

use parseexact with the format string "yyyy-dd-MM hh:mm tt" instead

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upvote for failed conversion return value –  Ben Sewards Jun 12 at 14:46

Try using safe TryParseExact method

DateTime temp;
    string  _date = "2011-29-01 12:00 am";
         DateTime.TryParseExact(_date, "yyyy-dd-MM hh:mm tt", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, out temp);
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DateTime dt = DateTime.ParseExact("11-22-2012 12:00 am", "MM-dd-yyyy hh:mm tt", System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
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If you give the user the opportunity to change the date/time format, then you'll have to create a corresponding format string to use for parsing. If you know the possible date formats (i.e. the user has to select from a list), then this is much easier because you can create those format strings at compile time.

If you let the user do free-format design of the date/time format, then you'll have to create the corresponding DateTime format strings at runtime.

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That's right jim If you let the user do free-format design of the date/time format, then you'll have to create the corresponding DateTime format strings at runtime. –  Pinal Apr 5 at 11:06

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