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Let's say I have a text file containing:

Dan
Warrior
500
1
0

Is there a way I can edit a specific line in that text file? Right now I have this:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import io

myfile = open('stats.txt', 'r')
dan = myfile.readline()
print dan
print "Your name: " + dan.split('\n')[0]

try:
    myfile = open('stats.txt', 'a')
    myfile.writelines('Mage')[1]
except IOError:
        myfile.close()
finally:
        myfile.close()

Yes, I know that myfile.writelines('Mage')[1] is incorrect. But you get my point, right? I'm trying to edit line 2 by replacing Warrior with Mage. But can I even do that?

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I think this post covers what you're looking for: stackoverflow.com/questions/1998233/… –  Kyle Wild Jan 18 '11 at 0:48
1  
If you have to do this sort of thing a lot, you might want to look into converting this file from text to something like bdb or other bdb-alike. –  Nick Bastin Jan 18 '11 at 1:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You want to do something like this:

# with is like your try .. finally block in this case
with open('stats.txt', 'r') as file:
    # read a list of lines into data
    data = file.readlines()

print data
print "Your name: " + data[0]

# now change the 2nd line, note that you have to add a newline
data[1] = 'Mage\n'

# and write everything back
with open('stats.txt', 'w') as file:
    file.writelines( data )

The reason for this is that you can't do something like "change line 2" directly in a file. You can only overwrite (not delete) parts of a file - that means that the new content just covers the old content. So, if you wrote 'Mage' over line 2, the resulting line would be 'Mageior'.

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Hi Jochen, the statement "with open(filename, mode)" also closes filename implicitly after program exits it, right? –  Radu May 28 '14 at 13:31
def replace_line(file_name, line_num, text):
    lines = open(file_name, 'r').readlines()
    lines[line_num] = text
    out = open(file_name, 'w')
    out.writelines(lines)
    out.close()

And then:

replace_line('stats.txt', 0, 'Mage')
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this would load the entire file's content into memory which might not be a good thing if the file is huge. –  Steve Ng Feb 24 '14 at 6:46
    
very nice solution! –  Konstantin Sep 12 '14 at 10:46

you can use fileinput to do in place editing

import fileinput
for  line in fileinput.FileInput("myfile", inplace=1):
    if line .....:
         print line
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If your text contains only one individual:

import re

# creation
with open('pers.txt','wb') as g:
    g.write('Dan \n Warrior \n 500 \r\n 1 \r 0 ')

with open('pers.txt','rb') as h:
    print 'exact content of pers.txt before treatment:\n',repr(h.read())
with open('pers.txt','rU') as h:
    print '\nrU-display of pers.txt before treatment:\n',h.read()


# treatment
def roplo(file_name,what):
    patR = re.compile('^([^\r\n]+[\r\n]+)[^\r\n]+')
    with open(file_name,'rb+') as f:
        ch = f.read()
        f.seek(0)
        f.write(patR.sub('\\1'+what,ch))
roplo('pers.txt','Mage')


# after treatment
with open('pers.txt','rb') as h:
    print '\nexact content of pers.txt after treatment:\n',repr(h.read())
with open('pers.txt','rU') as h:
    print '\nrU-display of pers.txt after treatment:\n',h.read()

If your text contains several individuals:

import re

# creation
with open('pers.txt','wb') as g:
    g.write('Dan \n Warrior \n 500 \r\n 1 \r 0 \n Jim  \n  dragonfly\r300\r2\n10\r\nSomo\ncosmonaut\n490\r\n3\r65')

with open('pers.txt','rb') as h:
    print 'exact content of pers.txt before treatment:\n',repr(h.read())
with open('pers.txt','rU') as h:
    print '\nrU-display of pers.txt before treatment:\n',h.read()


# treatment
def ripli(file_name,who,what):
    with open(file_name,'rb+') as f:
        ch = f.read()
        x,y = re.search('^\s*'+who+'\s*[\r\n]+([^\r\n]+)',ch,re.MULTILINE).span(1)
        f.seek(x)
        f.write(what+ch[y:])
ripli('pers.txt','Jim','Wizard')


# after treatment
with open('pers.txt','rb') as h:
    print 'exact content of pers.txt after treatment:\n',repr(h.read())
with open('pers.txt','rU') as h:
    print '\nrU-display of pers.txt after treatment:\n',h.read()

If the “job“ of an individual was of a constant length in the texte, you could change only the portion of texte corresponding to the “job“ the desired individual: that’s the same idea as senderle’s one.

But according to me, better would be to put the characteristics of individuals in a dictionnary recorded in file with cPickle:

from cPickle import dump, load

with open('cards','wb') as f:
    dump({'Dan':['Warrior',500,1,0],'Jim':['dragonfly',300,2,10],'Somo':['cosmonaut',490,3,65]},f)

with open('cards','rb') as g:
    id_cards = load(g)
print 'id_cards before change==',id_cards

id_cards['Jim'][0] = 'Wizard'

with open('cards','w') as h:
    dump(id_cards,h)

with open('cards') as e:
    id_cards = load(e)
print '\nid_cards after change==',id_cards
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