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I have a vector populated with objects:

std::vector<Stuff*> stuffVector;

and am trying to delete all elements of it using a cleanup function

void CleanUp()
{
    for (std::vector<Stuff*>::size_type i = 0 ; i < stuffVector.size() ; i++)
    {
        stuffVector.erase(stuffVector.begin()+i);
    }
    cout << stuffVector.size() << endl;
    if (stuffVector.size() == 0) cout << "Vector Emptied" << endl;
}

This always reports back with a size of however many objects are in the vector, and doesn't actually seem to delete anything at all. It's odd as a similar function works elsewhere to delete a specific object from the vector:

void DestroyStuff()
{
    if (stuffVector.size() > 1)
    {
        for (std::vector<Stuff*>::size_type i = 0 ; i < stuffVector.size() ; i++ )
        {
            if(stuffVector[i]->CanDestroy())
            {
                stuffVector.erase (stuffVector.begin()+i);
            }
        }
    }
}

The above works fine, but CleanUp() does not. Why might this be happening?

share|improve this question
    
Do not manage resources manually. Use a smart pointer. Problem solved. –  GManNickG Jan 18 '11 at 0:57
    
Question is unclear. Do you want to to delete p for each p in the vector, or do you just want to empty the vector, or do you want to empty vector and also have its buffer deallocated, or what? Answer depends on what effect you want. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 18 '11 at 1:01
    
"I have a vector populated with objects" -- no, you have a vector populated with pointers, which is the problem. Create a vector of objects instead. –  jalf Jan 18 '11 at 5:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is wrong:

for (std::vector<Stuff*>::size_type i = 0 ; i < stuffVector.size() ; i++)
{
    stuffVector.erase(stuffVector.begin()+i);
}

Imagine the vector has elements 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 in it. After the first erase (i==0), it would be 1, 2, 3, 4. The second erase with i==1 would render it 1, 3, 4, and in the end, it will end up as 1, 3.

The best alternative for clearing a vector would be

stuffVector.clear()

and, if that's unsuitable:

stuffVector.swap(std::vector<Stuff*>());

or

while(!stuffVector.empty()) stuffVector.pop_back();

or

stuffVector.erase(stuffVector.begin(), stuffVector.end());

Other means to delete contents of a vector are left as an exercise for the reader :)

If you wanna do something else with the elements before clearing them (... like deleting the objects the pointers point to) I'd suggest doing that separately and then clearing the vector as separate actions. Or swap with an empty vector and do whatever you want with the swapped vector.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a solution to clearing the vector (which is what the OP asked), but its worth noting that DestroyStuff() will invoke undefined behavior by operating on invalid iterators after the first erase() –  JaredC Jan 18 '11 at 1:17
    
@JaredC: It won't - OP's code doesn't hold any iterators that could be invalidated. –  jpalecek Jan 18 '11 at 12:10

When you erase an element, the size of the vector changes. So your loops are skipping over elements since on some iterations you erase() and i++.

Additionally, to remove every element of a vector the clear() function is useful. Also, the standard way of looping through all elements in a vector is to use iterators. Your code should look like this:

void CleanUp()
{
    for (std::vector<Stuff*>::iterator it = stuffVector.begin() ; it != stuffVector.end() ; it++)
    {
        /* .. do something to each element to prepare it for removal */
        delete *it;         // clean up resources?
    }
    stuffVector.clear();
    cout << stuffVector.size() << endl;
    if (stuffVector.size() == 0) cout << "Vector Emptied" << endl;
}

and

void DestroyStuff()
{

    for (std::vector<Stuff*>::iterator it = stuffVector.begin() ; it != stuffVector.end() ; /*done inline*/)
    {
        if((*it)->CanDestroy())
        {
            it = stuffVector.erase(it);
        }
        else
            ++it;
    }
}

This loop works because erase() returns an iterator to the next element in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't the stuffVector.emd be stuffVector.end? –  wrongusername Jan 18 '11 at 1:11
    
@wrongusername: thanks, corrected. –  JaredC Jan 18 '11 at 1:12
stuffvector.clear();

(min. length bah!)

share|improve this answer
    
the clear function does clear all the contents of the container. then you can free the pointer (if that's how you allocated space for the container). –  Yasky Jan 18 '11 at 1:01

Your problem with CleanUp() is vector::erase() does not call delete to free pointers or object destructors. It just drops the pointers and leaks memory.

share|improve this answer

Calling erase on an itertaor will invalidate the iterator

 stuffVector.erase(stuffVector.begin()+i);

followed by the following in for loop

 i++

A pointer, after delete, may not even be read or copied. Destruction invalidates the iterator The following may help

for(it = Entities.begin(); it != Entities.end();)
{
   if(...) //Conditional deletion
   {
       delete * it;
        it = Entities.erase(it);
   }
    else
    {
        it++;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Neera: Is this behavior defined when you use the same iterator after the erase() call? Should that iterator be assigned to the result of erase(), or post-incremented like erase(it++)? –  JaredC Jan 18 '11 at 1:21
    
Postincrement returns an unmodified copy of its operand before incrementing. Postincrement performs the increment before calling erase(), when it is valid to do so, while passing (a copy of) the unincremented iterator to that function. Also std::vector::erase returns a new, valid iterator to the element after the erased one (or end). Both these postincrement/returned itertaor form erase are also valid ways of deleting elements from vector –  Neera Jan 18 '11 at 1:27
    
@Neera: I agree, how does the code you have work then? –  JaredC Jan 18 '11 at 1:34
    
@Neera: I see the correction now :-) –  JaredC Jan 18 '11 at 1:37
    
Thanks for the suggested for loop. Implementing it tells me that 'it' was not declared in this scope however. –  zib24 Jan 18 '11 at 1:50

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