Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assuming an alphanumeric password of 8 characters the amount of permutations by my understanding would be.

26 lowercase
26 uppercase
10 digits

So if you were to do a brute force attack on this password the amount of tries on average would be (62 ^ 8) / 2

However assuming you knew that the password was at least 4 digits long and therefore excluded any attempts on the first 4 digits would the answer to the remaining permutations not be ((62 ^ 8) – (62 ^ 4)) / 2 ?

Am I missing something here or is that the correct answer?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you are missing something. No, that's not the correct answer :-)

Your original calculation is for a password that is exactly eight characters long, not one that is eight or less.

For a password which can be between four and eight characters, there's actually more search space than in your original calculation (not because less search space equates to more time taken, but because the original calculation was wrong).

For a password of one to eight characters, the search space is actually:

(62 ^ 1) + (62 ^ 2) + (62 ^ 3) + (62 ^ 4) +
(62 ^ 5) + (62 ^ 6) + (62 ^ 7) + (62 ^ 8)

and then you can divide that by two for the average number of checks (I won't since we're really only talking about ratios here).

Then, if you have the extra information that the password is at least four characters long, you can discount the first three terms to get:

                                 (62 ^ 4) +
(62 ^ 5) + (62 ^ 6) + (62 ^ 7) + (62 ^ 8)
share|improve this answer
    
Please explain? How does the second example produce a larger search space? –  Maxim Gershkovich Jan 18 '11 at 3:21
    
It produces a larger search space than your original incorrect calculation (62^8), not larger than the correct calculation (the first one I showed) - clarified in the answer. –  paxdiablo Jan 18 '11 at 3:23
    
Ok sorry got ya. But to be clear if you do have more information specifically that the password MUST BE greater then 4 chars your search space decreases, correct? PS: Thanks for your input –  Maxim Gershkovich Jan 18 '11 at 3:25
    
@Maxim, as my 7yo son would say: correctimundo :-) Your search space decreases if you have information that limits the number of passwords somehow. –  paxdiablo Jan 18 '11 at 3:27
    
Thanks again. :-) –  Maxim Gershkovich Jan 18 '11 at 3:27

I guess the right calculation for the number of combinations possible for your password will be:

(62^4) + (62^5) + (62^6) + (62^7) + (62^8)
share|improve this answer

For a password of at most 8 characters, there are 62^8 + 62^7 + 62^6 + 62^5 + 62^4 + 62^3 + 62^2 + 62 different passwords. If you know, however, that the password will be no less than 4 characters long, you may remove the last 3 terms, and get something like 62^8 + 62^7 + 62^6 + 62^5 + 62^4 different combinations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.