Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data file, which looks like this:


0.5, 0.0 [
 1.5, -1.0 [
  inputs
 ]
 ;
 0.5, 1.0 [
  inputs
 ]
]

Which I'm trying to parse into a tree-like structure. In the above example, the tree should end up like so:


             Node (0.5, 0.0)
             /             \
   Node (1.5, -1.0)   Node (0.5, 1.0)
                 \     /
               Inputs Node

Pretty much the tree structure is like any basic tree (with the exception that all the bottom-most nodes connect to the same inputs node.

So far, to parse it, I have the following:


private void createSubLayer (String net, Node parent, int level) {
  level++;
  String[] nodes = net.split(";");

  for (String node : nodes) {
   if (node.equals("inputs")) {
    System.out.println("Connecting input @ " + level);
    for (Node n : inputs) {
     parent.connect(n);
    }
   }
   else {
    Node newNode;
    String[] nodeInfo = node.split("\\[", 2);
    String nodeDetails = nodeInfo[0];
    System.out.println(nodeInfo.length);
    System.out.println(nodeDetails);
    String subNet = nodeInfo[1].substring(0, nodeInfo[1].length() - 1);
    String[] nodeTW = nodeDetails.split(",");
    double threshhold = Double.parseDouble(nodeTW[0]);
    double weight = (nodeTW.length == 2) ? Double.parseDouble(nodeTW[1]) : 0.0;
    newNode = new Node(threshhold);
    newNode.setWeight(weight);
    System.out.println("Connecting new node @ " + level + "\n\tThreshhold: " + threshhold + "\n\tWeight: " + weight);
    if (parent != null) {
     parent.connect(newNode);
    }
    else {
     root = newNode;
    }

    System.out.println("Using subnet: " + subNet);
    createSubLayer(subNet, newNode, level);
   }
  }
 }

And I'm calling it with


createSubLayer(data_file_contents, null, 0);

So far, this works fine for very basic data such as


1.9, 1.0[inputs]

However, the problem seems to be arising when I am splitting by the semi-colon in the first example. For obvious reasons, splitting this first results in (using the first example):


0.5, 0.0 [
    1.5, -1.0 [
        inputs
    ]

and


    0.5, 1.0 [
        inputs
    ]
]

Which is not the intended result.

How may I go about modifying this parsing process (or if need be, modifying the data file structure) to create the desired results? (dont worry about the Node.connect() calls or anything else, as long as I can get the structure correct)

As a fairly straightforward comparison, this structuring is essentially like an XML document, or JSON, or other similar formats, just lacking attribute and node names (since there are always only the two numeric attributes in order, and the node contents).

Thank you for any help!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need do a proper parsing when you have recursive structures as is this case. I would suggest you to look into http://www.antlr.org/ in order to write easily such a parser.

Another approach is to try to write a manual recursively descent parser (your format suggest to me that it ca be done) but it might seems a little complicated if you don't have an idea how it's done.

The general idea is to have a method named parseNode for example who would look if the next input is either a number or a name like inputs. If it is number will parse numbers until if finds a [ char. After that it will call parseNode recursively. After the parse node returns it would look at the next char and if it is ] it means it parsed all the childs. If not then the char should have been ; and it needs to eat it and call parseNode again. Once it finds ] it will return.

Basically this is how i would do it.

The following code will parse your string properly BUT remember that it has absolutely no error checking for invalid input, no proper parsing of strings into number and so on. It does however shows some working code for what i have suggested above. You should NOT put this code in production :).

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Main {

    static Node input = new Node();

    public static class Node {
        String numbers;
        List<Node> childs;
    }

    static class Input {
        String data;
        int pos;

        Input(String data, int pos) {
            this.data = data;
            this.pos = pos;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String data = "0.5, 0.0 [\n" +
                " 1.5, -1.0 [\n" +
                "  inputs\n" +
                " ]\n" +
                " ;\n" +
                " 0.5, 1.0 [\n" +
                "  inputs\n" +
                " ]\n" +
                "]";

        Node node = parseNode(new Input(data, 0));
    }

    private static Node parseNode(Input input) {
        StringBuffer stringBuffer = new StringBuffer();

        // eat chars until '[' or ']' or ';' or end of string
        boolean completed = false;
        char ch = input.data.charAt(input.pos);

        while (!completed && input.pos < input.data.length()) {
            ch = input.data.charAt(input.pos);
            switch (ch) {
                case '[':
                case ']':
                case ';':
                    completed = true;
                    break;
                default:
                    input.pos++;
                    stringBuffer.append(ch);
            }
        }

        String numbers = stringBuffer.toString().trim();

        if ( numbers.equalsIgnoreCase("inputs") ) {
            return Main.input;
        }

        Node thisNode = new Node();

        thisNode.numbers = numbers;
        thisNode.childs = new ArrayList<Node>();

        if ( ch == '[' ) { // we have childs
            do {
                input.pos++;
                thisNode.childs.add(parseNode(input));

                ch = input.data.charAt(input.pos);
                while ( ch != ';' && ch != ']' ) {
                    input.pos++;
                    ch = input.data.charAt(input.pos);
                }
            } while (ch == ';');

            if ( ch == ']' ) {
                input.pos++;
            }
        }

        return thisNode;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Eek ANTLR would be too much for this application I think, however I do like your solution, that was really the thing I was missing was the "look ahead". Thanks! –  jerluc Jan 18 '11 at 7:38
    
@jerluc You do know that this code will fail in a lot of ways (i rarely handle EOF as much as i should) :) –  Mihai Toader Jan 18 '11 at 7:40
    
Yeah, but conceptually, it's what I was missing from my original code. –  jerluc Jan 18 '11 at 8:17
    
@jerluc ok then. If you rewrite or fix it then it's all good :). Cheers. –  Mihai Toader Jan 18 '11 at 8:18

In case your format is subject to change (and may get a bit more complex), you could consider using a tool like ANTLR as Toader suggested. You then only need to write (or change) your grammar to generate a (new) lexer & parser. Take the following grammar:

grammar Test;

parse
  :  element+ EOF
  ;

element
  :  numberList Open atom (SemiCol atom)* Close
  ;

numberList
  :  Decimal (Comma Decimal)*
  ;

atom
  :  element
  |  Identifier
  ;

Open       : '[';
Close      : ']';
Comma      : ',';
SemiCol    : ';';
Identifier : ('a'..'z' | 'A'..'Z')+;
Decimal    : '0'..'9'+ '.' '0'..'9'+;
Spaces     : (' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n') {skip();};

When interpreting your example:

0.5, 0.0 [
 1.5, -1.0 [
  inputs
 ]
 ;
 0.5, 1.0 [
  inputs
 ]
]

ANTLRWorks produces the following parse tree:

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
Yep .. this is probably a better solution in mid to long term. –  Mihai Toader Jan 18 '11 at 7:42
    
@Toader, yeah, maybe (maybe not). I can imagine people being reluctant to go with a parser-generator tool: the learning curve is (for many people) on the steep side. But once you get the hang of it, it will be easier when the format changes (opposed to rewriting a hand-crafted parser). –  Bart Kiers Jan 18 '11 at 7:43
    
I could not agree more. That's the reason i actually bothered to write a working example in simple code instead of building an antrl grammar as you posted. But if you do this more than once it makes sense to at least try to do it in with a proper tool first :) –  Mihai Toader Jan 18 '11 at 7:47
    
ANTLR would be my first choice if this was some sort of DSL, but literally, as there will never be any major syntactical changes to this format, i could do without a grammar, though it is quite an intuitive solution. –  jerluc Jan 18 '11 at 8:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.