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As of today which is the best pseudo random number generator? By best I mean the one that -

  1. passes all statistical tests
  2. behaves well even at very high dimensions
  3. has an extremely large period

I can think of MT. Is there any PRNG that is better than MT? Which variant of MT is the best?

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What specific statistical tests do you want it to pass? There is no such thing as passing all statistical tests... –  Peter Recore Jan 18 '11 at 6:22
    
I agree that it may not pass all statistical tests. But my question is simple - which is the best PRNG (time and complexity of algorithm is not an issue) –  Nishanth Jan 18 '11 at 7:50
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try MT's successor: SFMT ( http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/~m-mat/MT/SFMT/index.html ). The acronym stands for SIMD-oriented Fast Mersenne Twister. It uses vector instructions, like SSE or AltiVec, to quick up random numbers generation.

Moreover it displays larger periods than the original MT: SFMT can be configured to use periods up to 2216091 -1.

Finally, MT had some problems when badly initialized: it tended to draw lots of 0, leading to bad quality random numbers. This problem could last up to 700000 draws before being compensated by the recurrence of the algorithm. As a consequence, SFMT has also been designed to leave this zero-excess state much quicker than its elder.

Check the link I've given at the beginning of this post to find the source code and the scientific publications describing this algorithm.

In order to definitely convince you, you can see here http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/~m-mat/MT/SFMT/speed.html a table comparing generation speeds of both MT and SFMT. In any case, SFMT is quicker while laying out better qualities than MT.

-- edit following commentaries --

More generally, when you're choosing a PRNG, you need to take into account the application you're developing. Indeed, some PRNGs fit better to some applications constraints. MT and WELL generators for instance aren't well suited for cryptographic applications, whereas they are the best choice when dealing with Monte Carlo Simulations.

In our case, WELL may seem ideal thanks to its better equidistribution properties than SFMT. Nonetheless, WELL is also far slower and he's not able to display periods as large as SFMT.

As a conclusion, a PRNG cannot be stated as best for all the applications, but for a particular domain and in particular circumstances withal.

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How does SFMT compare with WELL prng? –  Nishanth Jan 28 '11 at 6:00
    
ok found something. WELL is better than SFMT & MT : –  Nishanth Jan 28 '11 at 10:27
    
1  
This is generally wrong. You need to take into account the whole parameters: WELL has a better equidistribution property but is also far slower (about five times as slow indeed) than SFMT. Moreover, following your last criterion, WELL generators do not display the same overwhelming periods as SFMT: up to 2^44497 for well when SFMT proposes 2^216091. You can find these figures in the original SFMT publication. Be careful to consider the application and the PRNG as a whole when you have to decide which PRNG to use. math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/~saito/articles/sfmt.pdf –  jHackTheRipper Jan 28 '11 at 11:12
    
I agree. you've answered my question. –  Nishanth Jan 29 '11 at 5:07
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If you look for an algorithm, that passes all statistical tests, but is still fast you could try the Xorshift-Algorithm. Compared with the random library in Java it is about 30% faster and provides better results. Its Period is not as long as the Mersenne Twister's but its still decent.

An implementation can be found here:

http://demesos.blogspot.com/2011/09/replacing-java-random-generator.html

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Well, the WELL generator is a generalization and improvement of MT-19937.

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MT seems to pass your criteria:

It has the colossal period of 219937−1 iterations (>43×106,000), is proven to be equidistributed in (up to) 623 dimensions (for 32-bit values), and runs faster than other statistically reasonable generators

(From: Wikipedia)

The Mersenne Twister is one of the most extensively tested random number generators in existence. However, being completely deterministic, it is not suitable for all purposes, and is completely unsuitable for cryptographic purposes.

(From: Python docs)

And wikipedia has somethings to say about cryptographically secure prng's, if that's your interest.

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Yes, MT does satisfy all those criteria. So is there any PRNG better than MT? –  Nishanth Jan 18 '11 at 7:51
    
It need not be cryptographically secure. –  Nishanth Jan 18 '11 at 7:51
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I think that mine is the best or potentially can be it uses technology and math that has not even been developed yet except by me myself and I I don't have a name for it yet but it is completely integer based at it's root and it uses an algorythm and mathematics I designed myself I have tested it fully at a variety of test sites basically you have an array of integers in any given base , you add up the numbers and mod the final result by the base being used.

Following me so far?? then you use one or two other arrays , with some arbitrarily random numbers in them and add them up to each element in the array as it gets added , in addition you can BASE INVERT every other integer value in the first array to get its Base inverse and add that to the total instead of the number itself all the arrays except the main one get scrambled (random shuffled) at random points in time, picked from the random pool itself

This ensures that in the long term future no repeated patterns can arise, or at least much later than would be otherwise the result is a very good pool of random integers , that has an EXTREMELY long period...

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here is another random number generator that you could build that would pass all tests of random number generation, is use Prime number Length arrays for all primes within a certain range this uses several arrays but as many of them will be small there is no real big problem here , put values into each of the arrays, that is fill them all up with random seed data

then add up all the values in each of the arrays separately using the base M inversion where M is the base of the numbers in that specific array, ON EVERY OTHER MEMBER OF THAT ARRAY , take the SUM of all these answers or outputs and MOD it with the main base used for all of the arrays (also for each array Values drop off the left or low end as new values are created , moving all of the values towards the low end of the array.

The main array would be the biggest Prime Number length array The resulting period would be the product of all the lengths of these prime number length arrays. and most likely the numbers would pass all or most tests of randomness and be quite random..

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