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Octal number literals: when? why? ever?

Hello everyone,

Inspiring from a obfuscated piece of code, I have a small question regarding to assign value to an integer:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

int main() {
    int i = 0101;
    std::cout << i << "\n";
}

And the output was 65, and I have no idea where 65 came from? Any idea?

Thanks,
Chan

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marked as duplicate by Greg Hewgill, ybungalobill, Loki Astari, Hans Passant, Graviton Jan 18 '11 at 8:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
This is a duplicate of many other similar questions, but they're really hard to search for. Here's one instead, that might be your next question: Octal number literals: when? why? ever? –  Greg Hewgill Jan 18 '11 at 6:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It specifies an octal (base-8) number: 0101 == 1 * (8 * 8) + 1 == 65.

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@:Lambert: Thanks a lot ;)! It was really interesting. –  Chan Jan 18 '11 at 6:05
    
@Chan: You're welcome. :) I actually learned it myself a few hours ago, when learning about the grammar of the D language! –  Mehrdad Jan 18 '11 at 6:06
    
lol ^_^ ! I was surprised when hearing that. –  Chan Jan 18 '11 at 6:08
    
@Chan: The full expansion of 0101, if the extra detail helps you understand: 101 in base 8 is (each digit from left to right) 1 * (8 ** 2) + 0 * (8 ** 1) + 1 * (8 ** 0); this reduces to the expression in the answer. –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 6:37

Lambert already explained that. So let me tell you what else you can do.

You can write hexadecimal integer:

int main() {
    int i = 0x101; //0x specifies this (i.e 101) is hexadecimal integer
    std::cout << i << "\n"; //prints 257 (1 * 16 * 16 + 1)
}

Output:

257
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