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Here is the sample code:

class Class1
{
    string a;

    public Class1(string over) : base()
    {
       this.a = over;
       Console.WriteLine(a);
    }

    public Class1(bool check)
    {
       if(check)
         Console.WriteLine(a);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Class1 myClass1 = new Class1("test");
        Class1 myClass2 = new Class1(true);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

What I want to happen is to get the value of string a from the 1nd Constructor Class1(string) and display it to Constructor Class1(bool). How can I do that?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean display it to Class1(bool) – Michael Shimmins Jan 18 '11 at 6:59
    
Console.WriteLine(a); because its just giving me blank result – Rye Jan 18 '11 at 7:01
1  
Why would you want to do that? the two objects should be independent and separate - why should the new Class1(true) know about the existence of the "test" string? There are some fundamental problems in the question here, that mean that a different design is wanted. – Marc Gravell Jan 18 '11 at 7:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make string astatic. That way, all instances of Class1 reference the same string.

share|improve this answer
    
hahaha! slap to the forehead forgot that thank you! – Rye Jan 18 '11 at 7:06
2  
It answers the OPs question, but IMO this just papers over some cracks - it makes no sense to me that this is a sane thing to do - what if I want multiple Class objects with different strings? what about threading? security (of strings that have no business being somewhere else)? This isn't critique of the answer - more the fault of the question for not making it clear what and why... – Marc Gravell Jan 18 '11 at 7:21

You have two different instances of Class1: myClass1 and MyClass2 If 'a' needs to be shared across instances, then you can make it static.

That way, setting 'a' in any instance of Class1 will apply to all instances.

share|improve this answer

This should work, but i dont think you should be doing that.

class Class1 {     

    static string a;  

    public Class1(string over) : base() {        
        a = over;        
        Console.WriteLine(a);     
    }      
    public Class1(bool check)     {        
        if(check)          
            Console.WriteLine(a);     
        } 
    }  

    class Program {     
        static void Main(string[] args)     {         
            Class1 myClass1 = new Class1("test");         
            Class1 myClass2 = new Class1(true);         
            Console.ReadLine();     
        } 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code won't compile, because you forgot the curly brace after if(check). Should be if(check){. And I don't think you should try to call Main from a nested class!! – froeschli Jan 18 '11 at 7:37

Pass myClass1 to myClass2 in a method call (or in the constructor)

It is hard to tell what to do because Class1, a, over, check. They don't make sense to me.

share|improve this answer

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