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Can anyone please tell me the proper concept of a canonical hostname and how can I check what is the canonical hostname on Windows?

Actually, I am facing a problem: I have a Java code which converts an input "server name" to its canonical hostname:

try {
    InetAddress in = InetAddress.getByName(REQUESTSERVER);
    REQUESTSERVER = in.getCanonicalHostName();
    System.out.println("Canonical REQUESTSERVER "+ REQUESTSERVER );
} catch(Exception e) {
    System.out.println("lookup failed");
}

Can the variable REQUESTSERVER have different values across a network?

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@momojeet - Not sure I follow. What is the value of REQUESTSERVER before you reassign the value? –  jmort253 Jan 18 '11 at 7:23
    
@jmort :- its the name of a server like pns15a.crpny.ksrt.com..something like that... –  monojeet Jan 18 '11 at 7:27
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2 Answers

Have a look at the example listed here for getting the CanonicalHostName() for google. One of the output it gets for www.google.com is

Which Host:www.google.com
Canonical Host Name:po-in-f104.google.com
Host Name:www.google.com
Host Address:72.14.253.104

When i ran the same program on my local box i got the output as

Which Host:www.google.com
Canonical Host Name:74.125.227.49
Host Name:www.google.com
Host Address:74.125.227.49

So , depending how the reppective DNS is configured , variable REQUESTSERVER will have different values accross a network

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ok go it , thanks....can you tell me how to get that name on windows and linux machines... –  monojeet Jan 18 '11 at 7:57
    
The different values:- How can i get it without this piece of code..I need both for linux and windows! –  monojeet Jan 18 '11 at 8:05
    
As far as i know , if both the machines are on the same network with the same DNS server, the canonical names will be same for both of 'em. –  Clyde Lobo Jan 18 '11 at 8:52
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Yes, certainly in the (common) case of virtual hosting where a single physical host provides different virtual websites. In this case the hostname used by the client to access the server will be available from the Java Servlet method ServletRequest.getServerName().

See this SO question.

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