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Using extension method we can create methods to convert an enum to other datatype like string, int by creating extension methods ToInt(), ToString(), etc for the enum.

I wonder how to implement the other way around, e.g. FromInt(int), FromString(string), etc. As far as I know I can't create MyEnum.FromInt() (static) extension method. So what are the possible approaches for this?

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5  
You make the extension method on int and string, not the enum... –  Oded Jan 18 '11 at 8:44
1  
wouldn't that kind of pollute int and string since they are used a lot and mostly not related to my enum? –  Louis Rhys Jan 18 '11 at 8:49
    
Such a method (like my ToEnum<> below) would be general purpose enough (almost like ToString(), almost). –  Maxim Gueivandov Jan 18 '11 at 10:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I would avoid polluting int or string with extension methods for enums, instead a good old fashioned static helper class might be in order.

public static class EnumHelper
{
   public static T FromInt<T>(int value)
   {
       return (T)value;
   }

  public static T FromString<T>(string value)
  {
     return (T) Enum.Parse(typeof(T),value);
  }
}
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1  
FromInt does not compile for me, Cannot convert type 'int' to 'T' ? –  Cel Nov 8 '11 at 12:20
    
Is T an enum? Is it an int enum? –  Jamiec Nov 8 '11 at 13:08
1  
I'm not even calling it and compilation fails - I got this to work instead: public static T ToEnum<T>(this int value) { return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), value.ToString()); } –  Cel Nov 8 '11 at 17:44
    
(using .net framework 4) –  Cel Nov 8 '11 at 17:45
    
Big chances of getting exceptions, I would use a combination of this solutions with Reddeckwins's solution below (using IsDefined and TryParse) to avoid unnecessary problems, of course depending on the situation. –  hellyeah Oct 13 '13 at 10:30

Do you really need those extension methods?

MyEnum fromInt = (MyEnum)someIntValue;
MyEnum fromString = (MyEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), someStringValue, true);

int intFromEnum = (int)MyEnum.SomeValue;
string stringFromEnum = MyEnum.SomeValue.ToString();
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You can do:

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    public static Enum FromInt32(this Enum obj, Int32 value)
    {
        return (Enum)((Object)(value));
    }

    public static Enum FromString(this Enum obj, String value)
    {
        return (Enum)Enum.Parse(obj.GetType(), value);
    }
}

Or:

public static class Int32Extensions
{
    public static Enum ToEnum(this Int32 obj)
    {
        return (Enum)((Object)(obj));
    }
}

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static Enum ToEnum(this Enum obj, String value)
    {
        return (Enum)Enum.Parse(obj.GetType(), value);
    }
}
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Another approach (for the string part of your question):

/// <summary>
/// Static class for generic parsing of string to enum
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of the enum to be parsed to</typeparam>
public static class Enum<T>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Parses the specified value from string to the given Enum type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Parse(string value)
    {
        //Null check
        if(value == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("value");
        //Empty string check
        value = value.Trim();
        if(value.Length == 0) throw new ArgumentException("Must specify valid information for parsing in the string", "value");
        //Not enum check
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if(!t.IsEnum) throw new ArgumentException("Type provided must be an Enum", "T");

        return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), value);
    }
}

(Partially inspired by: http://devlicious.com/blogs/christopher_bennage/archive/2007/09/13/my-new-little-friend-enum-lt-t-gt.aspx)

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The other way around would be possibly... the other way around ;) Extend int and string with generic extension methods which will take as type parameter the type of an enum:

public static TEnum ToEnum<TEnum>(this int val)
{
    return (TEnum) System.Enum.ToObject(typeof(TEnum), val);
}

public static TEnum ToEnum<TEnum>(this string val)
{
    return (TEnum) System.Enum.Parse(typeof(TEnum), val);
}

There is unfortunately no generic constraint for Enums, so we have to check TEnum type during runtime; to simplify we'll leave that verification to Enum.ToObject and Enum.Parse methods.

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why do you want FromInt an extenstion method versus just casting it?

MyEnum fromInt;
if(Enum.IsDefined(typeof(MyEnum), intvalue))
{
    fromInt = (MyEnum) intvalue;
}
else
{
    //not valid
}

alternatively, for strings, you can use Enum.TryParse

MyEnum fromString;
if (Enum.TryParse<MyEnum>(stringvalue, out fromString))
{
    //succeeded
}
else
{
    //not valid
}
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What if stringvalue and intvalue is not the same as the underlying value? –  Louis Rhys Jan 18 '11 at 9:02
    
I don't quite get what you are saying. Are you asking what happens in the string or int do not represent any of the enum values? –  RedDeckWins Jan 18 '11 at 18:59
    
yes. In other words, I can't use Parse or casting –  Louis Rhys Jan 18 '11 at 22:24
    
Updated code to handle the invalid cases –  RedDeckWins Jan 18 '11 at 23:07

You can either make extension methods on int and string.

Or make static method on some other static class. Maybe something like EnumHelper.FromInt(int).

But I would pose one question : Why do you want to convert to string or int? Its not how you normaly work with enumerables, except maybe serialisation. But that should be handled by some kind of infrastructure, not your own code.

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re your question: I am creating a wrapper around more than one library. They don't have the same convention regarding some string, so I try to create an enum so that they'll have the same convention. –  Louis Rhys Jan 18 '11 at 9:01

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