Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

can anyone explain to me how to identify using regexes any string that contains for example a single P character in it? Could yo also explain how this is evaluated too?

EDIT: What is the difference between [^P*] and [^P]*?

share|improve this question
2  
please think of a better title of the question. –  Bozho Jan 18 '11 at 8:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A string containing a single P character is:

  • a (possibly empty) string containing non-P characters
  • a P
  • a (possibly empty) string containing non-P characters

In a regular expression format, this is:

^[^P]*P[^P]*$

where:

  • ^ matches the start of the string
  • [^P]* matches any character other than a P, 0 or more times
  • P matches P
  • [^P]* matches any character other than a P, 0 or more times
  • $ matches the end of the string

The difference between [^P*] and [^P]* is:

  • [^P*] matches any single character that is neither P nor *
  • [^P]* matches zero or more characters that are not P

The placement of the * is of course important here. Inside [], the * doesn't have any special meaning. Outside [], the * means "match the previous thing zero or more times".

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem to work on the regex checker..? Checking Here: gskinner.com/RegExr –  dr85 Jan 18 '11 at 9:01
3  
Then there's something wrong with your regex chaecker, @david :-) I suggest you check it on the only checker that really matters, a Java program. –  paxdiablo Jan 18 '11 at 9:03
    
what is the difference between [^P*] and [^P]* –  dr85 Jan 18 '11 at 9:09
    
also what is the relevance of the initial ^ ? –  dr85 Jan 18 '11 at 9:09
1  
@david robers - Everything is documented on the Pattern class - please, have at look at it first. –  Andreas_D Jan 18 '11 at 9:12

David, I think my answer at one of your previous questions will help you out. As for how it is evaluated, I'm not sure what you mean, but you might want to check out the API documentation for the Pattern class.

The difference between [^P*] and [^P]* is:

  • [^P*] means "one character that is not P and *"
  • [^P]* means "zero or more characters that are all not P"
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I couldn;t get you answer to work on the regex checker either. I'm looking at the API but it doesn;t really help you understand how the regex engine works... I.e. does it start at the beginning of a string? –  dr85 Jan 18 '11 at 9:03
    
Generally yes, it does start at the beginning of the string, and each subsequent call to Matcher.find() will search out the next match. Please share the name of, or what sort of, regex checker you are using so we can help you more :-). –  Zach L Jan 18 '11 at 9:08
    
Im using gskinner.com/RegExr –  dr85 Jan 18 '11 at 9:19

assuming you really want to check for a single "P". here's a non regex approach.

for(int i = 0 ;i< string.length(); i++){
    if ( string.charAt(i) == 'P' ){
        count++;
    }
}
if ( count == 1 ){
    System.out.println("String contains a single P");
}
share|improve this answer
    
string.contains("P") might be a slightly more simplified version :-) –  Zach L Jan 18 '11 at 9:16
    
true:). whatever works. :) –  ghostdog74 Jan 18 '11 at 9:28
    
well, I spoke too soon: yours makes sure that there is only one P. I take back my comment. Nevermind :-) –  Zach L Jan 18 '11 at 9:45
    
oh, i thought you are talking about using containS() in the for loop instead of charAt(), which i think is also valid. –  ghostdog74 Jan 18 '11 at 9:46
    
Yeah, just ignore my comment, I was thinking a little silly. –  Zach L Jan 18 '11 at 9:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.