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Is there any possibility implement interface in annotation? Something like:

public @interface NotNull implements LevelInterface  {
    ValidationLevel level();
};
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no, there isn't. What would you use that for? –  sfussenegger Jan 18 '11 at 9:23
1  
Please don't format code blocks using <pre>. Select a code block and click the button with the two curly braces (or press ctrl+k) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 18 '11 at 9:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, the compiler says "Annotation type declaration cannot have explicit superinterfaces".

You cannot extend either: "Annotation type declaration cannot have an explicit superclass".

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No, an annotation can not have super-interfaces* (although interfaces can extend from an annotation, and classes can implement an annotation, both of which is an awful practice imho)

[*] The funny thing is: I can't find any document that explicitly says so, except the java compiler output (neither the Sun Java Tutorial, nor the Java 1.5 Annotations specification)

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Short answer is No (exactly as Thilo said).

Long answer is if you really wish such functionality you can use delegation: annotation can hold as many as you wish fields that implement as many as you want interfaces. Please see the following example:

public interface LevelInterface {
    public int level();
}

public static LevelInterface foo = new LevelInterface() {
    @Override
    public int level() {
        return 123;
    }

};

 public @interface NotNull {
     LevelInterface level = foo;
 }
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4  
This does not have any effect (there is no way to access such a field). Annotation members are methods, not fields, and their types must be compile-type constants: Strings, primitives, classes, enums, other annotations or arrays of any of these. If you want to do @NotNull(level=Something) you must declare level like this: LevelInterface level() default foo; , but as I said before this won't compile (neither LevelInterface nor foo are valid). Reference –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 18 '11 at 9:32
    
It does have effect if you use predefined values. For example my foo constant can be passed to the annotation. Enums are used in this case too. You can define interface, then create enum that implements this interface. Then you can use members of this enum in annotation. I think it is very popular pattern. –  AlexR Jan 18 '11 at 9:38
1  
please show a working example of what you are talking about (or link to one). From the Annotations Reference: Return types are restricted to primitives, String, Class, enums, annotations, and arrays of the preceding types. So, yes, the type can be an enum that implements an interface, but not the interface itself. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 18 '11 at 9:46
    
your answers are usually very good, but this one is bad. Please fix it or delete it. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 18 '11 at 11:11
    
Although this is compilable, level = foo; becomes a public static final, similar to when declaring "fields" like that in ordinary interfaces. –  Simon André Forsberg Oct 21 '13 at 19:13

No, you can not (as said in my comment). You may use delegation though (as said by AlexR). However, you'll have to use an enum:

public enum LevelEnum implements LevelInterface {
  DEFAULT {
    public ValidationLevel level() {
      // SNIP (your code)
    }
  };
}

public @interface NotNull {
  LevelEnum level() default LevelEnum.DEFAULT;
}
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1  
This does not compile. You must use ` LevelEnum level() default LevelEnum.DEFAULT;` You can not use an interface as type and pass in different enums that implement the interface. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 18 '11 at 9:49
    
@sean you're of course right. That's one of the reasons why copy-pasting code (from your comment to AlexR's response) is a Bad Thing (tm) :) –  sfussenegger Jan 18 '11 at 10:31

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