Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I run a JavaScript code when the page loads without using the onload tag?

I'm trying to run this script:

<script type="text/javascript">
function displayLightbox() {
    document.getElementById('light').style.display='block';document.getElementById('fade').style.display='block'
}
</script>

That displays a lightbox.

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason for doing this? –  Vijay Dev Jan 18 '11 at 9:58
    
Yes, I am developing for a system that for some reason strips the body tag from the onload field. –  hoverhand Jan 18 '11 at 9:59
    
@OrW do you mean SharePoint by any chance? –  Shadow Wizard Jan 18 '11 at 10:00
    
No, RightNow CRM –  hoverhand Jan 18 '11 at 10:01
    
@OrW: And does the CRM have its own onload script? –  Shadow Wizard Jan 18 '11 at 10:02
show 3 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Like this:

window.onload = function WindowLoad(event) {
    alert("Page is loaded");
}

Edit: if some other code is also using window.onload after that script then it will be "overwritten" - to make sure it's executed (and abort any other onload) put it in the bottom of the page.

Edit 2: On second thought, you better add onload listener instead of overwriting it:

<script type="text/javascript">
if (window.addEventListener) { // Mozilla, Netscape, Firefox
    window.addEventListener('load', WindowLoad, false);
} else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE
    window.attachEvent('onload', WindowLoad);
}

function WindowLoad(event) {
    alert("Another onload script");
}
</script>

This will prevent any conflicts with existing code and is more cross browser as far as I can tell.

Live test case is available here: http://jsfiddle.net/yahavbr/GZPTG/ tested for IE8, Chrome and Firefox (latest versions) feel free to test for more.

share|improve this answer
    
Named function expressions don't work correctly in Internet Explorer 8 and lower, so it's generally best to avoid them. –  Andy E Jan 18 '11 at 10:02
    
@Andy care to elaborate? Quick test in IE8 showed the alert just fine, and used it for IE6 and IE7 in the past as well.. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 18 '11 at 10:05
    
This works perfectly. Thank you. –  hoverhand Jan 18 '11 at 10:16
    
@Shadow: what I meant was that your function expression will behave differently - in Internet Explorer it will create a function named WindowLoad, available to the outer scope whereas in other browsers it will create a function that is not available to the outer scope but can be accessed from within the function by its name. Other than that it will work just fine, but it's better to leave the name off or use a proper function declaration depending on what you want to do. A much better explanation is available at kangax.github.com/nfe. –  Andy E Jan 18 '11 at 10:21
    
@Andy thanks, wasn't aware of that. So far it wasn't relevant for me but it's always good to be on top of things. :) –  Shadow Wizard Jan 18 '11 at 11:34
show 1 more comment

maybe put a javascript code at the end of the page just before the closing </body> tag.

.
.
.
<script>
 yourFunctionHere();
</script>
</body>
share|improve this answer
1  
It won't wait for images to get loaded, for one. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 18 '11 at 10:01
add comment

You can do

<head>
<script>
document.onload = function() { /*run code here */}
</script>
</head>

A cleaner way would be

<head>
<script>
document.addEventListener('onload',funciton(){
 /* run code here */
});
</script>
</head>

since this allows for multiple eventhandlers to the same event

A better way is usually to react to domReady though.

Most javascript libraries support easy ways to hook into domReady. In jQuery for example you can do it like this:

$(function() {
/* code here will be run as soon as the dom is ready to be interacted with, 
   but before document.load occurs which means you don't have to wait for 
   images to load for example
*/
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

You should use the onload function because you will come across less problems when trying to debug it in different browsers.

The only other way I know to simulate this effect reliably is to have a script tag block just before the at the footer of the page.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.