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Is there a way to show the console in a Windows Application?

What i want to do is something like that:

static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        bool consoleMode = Boolean.Parse(args[0]);

        if (consoleMode) {
            Console.WriteLine("consolemode started");
            // ...
        } else {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
}

best regards

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7 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

What you want to do is not possible in a sane way. There was a similar question so look at the answers.

Then there's also an insane approach (site down - backup available here.) written by Jeffrey Knight:

Question: How do I create an application that can run in either GUI (windows) mode or command line / console mode?

On the surface of it, this would seem easy: you create a Console application, add a windows form to it, and you're off and running. However, there's a problem:

Problem: If you run in GUI mode, you end up with both a window and a pesky console lurking in the background, and you don't have any way to hide it.

What people seem to want is a true amphibian application that can run smoothly in either mode.

If you break it down, there are actually four use cases here:

User starts application from existing cmd window, and runs in GUI mode
User double clicks to start application, and runs in GUI mode
User starts application from existing cmd window, and runs in command mode
User double clicks to start application, and runs in command mode.

I'm posting the code to do this, but with a caveat.

I actually think this sort of approach will run you into a lot more trouble down the road than it's worth. For example, you'll have to have two different UIs' -- one for the GUI and one for the command / shell. You're going to have to build some strange central logic engine that abstracts from GUI vs. command line, and it's just going to get weird. If it were me, I'd step back and think about how this will be used in practice, and whether this sort of mode-switching is worth the work. Thus, unless some special case called for it, I wouldn't use this code myself, because as soon as I run into situations where I need API calls to get something done, I tend to stop and ask myself "am I overcomplicating things?".

Output type=Windows Application

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Diagnostics;
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace WindowsApplication
{
    static class Program
    {
        /*
    DEMO CODE ONLY: In general, this approach calls for re-thinking 
    your architecture!
    There are 4 possible ways this can run:
    1) User starts application from existing cmd window, and runs in GUI mode
    2) User double clicks to start application, and runs in GUI mode
    3) User starts applicaiton from existing cmd window, and runs in command mode
    4) User double clicks to start application, and runs in command mode.

    To run in console mode, start a cmd shell and enter:
        c:\path\to\Debug\dir\WindowsApplication.exe console
        To run in gui mode,  EITHER just double click the exe, OR start it from the cmd prompt with:
        c:\path\to\Debug\dir\WindowsApplication.exe (or pass the "gui" argument).
        To start in command mode from a double click, change the default below to "console".
    In practice, I'm not even sure how the console vs gui mode distinction would be made from a
    double click...
        string mode = args.Length > 0 ? args[0] : "console"; //default to console
    */

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern bool AllocConsole();

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern bool FreeConsole();

        [DllImport("kernel32", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern bool AttachConsole(int dwProcessId);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, out int lpdwProcessId);

        [STAThread]
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            //TODO: better handling of command args, (handle help (--help /?) etc.)
            string mode = args.Length > 0 ? args[0] : "gui"; //default to gui

            if (mode == "gui")
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Welcome to GUI mode");

                Application.EnableVisualStyles();

                Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

                Application.Run(new Form1());
            }
            else if (mode == "console")
            {

                //Get a pointer to the forground window.  The idea here is that
                //IF the user is starting our application from an existing console
                //shell, that shell will be the uppermost window.  We'll get it
                //and attach to it
                IntPtr ptr = GetForegroundWindow();

                int  u;

                GetWindowThreadProcessId(ptr, out u);

                Process process = Process.GetProcessById(u);

                if (process.ProcessName == "cmd" )    //Is the uppermost window a cmd process?
                {
                    AttachConsole(process.Id);

                    //we have a console to attach to ..
                    Console.WriteLine("hello. It looks like you started me from an existing console.");
                }
                else
                {
                    //no console AND we're in console mode ... create a new console.

                    AllocConsole();

                    Console.WriteLine(@"hello. It looks like you double clicked me to start
                   AND you want console mode.  Here's a new console.");
                    Console.WriteLine("press any key to continue ...");
                    Console.ReadLine();       
                }

                FreeConsole();
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
Wow, it's insane! But it works, thanks! –  lesderid Nov 13 '10 at 16:42
5  
I find it ironic with Microsoft and how it wants to create C# interfaces for all of it's API, yet there is no C# way to perform such a simple task. –  Ramon Zarazua Apr 17 '11 at 8:57
2  
Rather than depending on console being the foreground window, you could get parent process id of current process using winapi: stackoverflow.com/a/3346055/855432 –  ghord Sep 11 '12 at 8:06
2  
As of the time of writing, backup copy of the article is available here web.archive.org/web/20111227234507/http://www.rootsilver.com/… –  zespri Apr 18 '13 at 2:19
1  
Hi! I found that if I ran this solution from shell like Far, nc it creates new console. If I attache to Far Console like cmd it works wrong. I recommend to create ConsoleApplication and if GUI needed then do FreeConsole(); Excellent article! Thanks! –  Maxim Vasiliev May 16 '13 at 9:44
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This is a tad old (OK, it's VERY old), but I'm doing the exact same thing right now. Here's a very simple solution that's working for me:

    public static void ShowConsoleWindow()
    {
        var handle = GetConsoleWindow();

        if (handle == IntPtr.Zero)
        {
            AllocConsole();
        }
        else
        {
            ShowWindow(handle, SW_SHOW);
        }
    }

    public static void HideConsoleWindow()
    {
        var handle = GetConsoleWindow();

        ShowWindow(handle, SW_HIDE);
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern bool AllocConsole();

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    static extern IntPtr GetConsoleWindow();

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern bool ShowWindow(IntPtr hWnd, int nCmdShow);

    const int SW_HIDE = 0;
    const int SW_SHOW = 5;
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4  
Worked much better than the accepted answer. –  Pavel Chikulaev Jun 6 '13 at 6:29
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Disclaimer

There is a way to achieve this which is quite simple, but I wouldn't suggest it is a good approach for an app you are going to let other people see. But if you had some developer need to show the console and windows forms at the same time, it can be done quite easily.

This method also supports showing only the Console window, but does not support showing only the Windows Form - i.e. the Console will always be shown. You can only interact (i.e. receive data - Console.ReadLine(), Console.Read()) with the console window if you do not show the windows forms; output to Console - Console.WriteLine() - works in both modes.

This is provided as is; no guarantees this won't do something horrible later on, but it does work.

Project steps

Start from a standard Console Application.

Mark the Main method as [STAThread]

Add a reference in your project to System.Windows.Forms

Add a Windows Form to your project.

Add the standard Windows start code to your Main method:

End Result

You will have an application that shows the Console and optionally windows forms.

Sample Code

Program.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace ConsoleApplication9 {
    class Program {

        [STAThread]
        static void Main(string[] args) {

            if (args.Length > 0 && args[0] == "console") {
                Console.WriteLine("Hello world!");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else {
                Application.EnableVisualStyles(); 
                Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false); 
                Application.Run(new Form1());
            }
        }
    }
}

Form1.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace ConsoleApplication9 {
    public partial class Form1 : Form {
        public Form1() {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
            Console.WriteLine("Clicked");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice code here. but how do you disable showing the console if you want to sell or deploy or something else.??? –  r4ccoon Sep 20 '09 at 21:50
    
@r4ccoon - you can't. But you can easily move all your code to a normal Windows app. –  Sam Meldrum Dec 3 '10 at 9:22
    
Well, IMHO a simpler way to achieve the same effect is to create a Windows Forms Project as usual, then right click it in the Solution Explorer -> Properties, and change Output Type to Console Application. (edit: now I've realised it's basically ICR's answer) –  kamilk Jan 2 '13 at 11:22
    
Nice Step by step Answer –  Jeson Park Jun 24 '13 at 9:15
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Easiest way is to start a WinForms application, go to settings and change the type to a console application.

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Application -> output type: Console Application. Did it for me! –  Lodewijk Mar 22 at 20:54
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In wind32, console-mode applications are a completely different beast from the usual message-queue-receiving applications. They are declared and compile differently. You might create an application which has both a console part and normal window and hide one or the other. But suspect you will find the whole thing a bit more work than you thought.

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Check this source code out: http://reg2run.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/reg2run/trunk/ManualConsole.cs?view=markup (project 'reg2run')

All commented code used to create a console in windows app, currently uncommented - to hide the console in console app

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Actually AllocConsole with SetStdHandle in a GUI application might be a safer approach. The problem with the "console hijacking" already mentioned, is that the console might not be a foreground window at all, (esp. considering the influx of new window managers in Vista/Windows 7) among other things.

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