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In an implementation of the visitor pattern with interfaces as follow (feel free to tell me if you think the interfaces themselves are wrong), who should be responsible for tracking a list of all the items visited? The visitor or the visitable? Specifically, the tracker must also be responsible for making sure the same item isn't visited twice (if the graph I'm visiting contains circular references).

/// <summary>
/// Defines a type that may accept visitors.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
public interface IVisitable<T>
{
    // Methods
    void Accept(T instance, IVisitor<T> visitor);
}

/// <summary>
/// Defines a type that visits objects.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
public interface IVisitor<T>
{
    // Methods
    void Visit(IVisitable<T> visitable);

    // Properties
    bool HasCompleted { get; }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The visitor should keep track of all items that it have visited. The visitor is always aware of what it visits, compared to the IVisitable who only knows that it can be visited.

Any other solution would increase the coupling.

As your interfaces, I would change them so that they look like this:

public interface IVisitable<T>
{
    void Accept(IVisitor<T> visitor);
}

public interface IVisitor<T>
{
    bool Visit(T item);
}

This means that the visitor should keep a list of visited items if it may not process the same item more than once:

public class MyVisitor : IVisitor<TheItem>
{
    private List<TheItem> _visitedItems = new List<TheItem>();

    public bool Visit(TheItem item)
    {
         if (_visitedItems.Contains(item)) return true;
         _visitedItems.Add(item);

         //process here. Return false when iteration should be stopped.
    }
}

public class MyItems : IVisitable<TheItem>
{

     public void Accept(IVisitor<TheItem> visitor)
     {
         foreach (var item in items)
         {
             if (!visitor.Visit(item))
                 break;
         }
     }
}

Update 2

IEnumerable (iterators) is really an evolution of the visitor pattern. The difference is that you move the loop from inside the visited class to outside.

Update 3

You can create a list: List<MyItem> items = new List<MyItem>(); and iterate it using the foreach statement (which uses the IEnumerable<T> interface):

foreach (var item in items)
{
    //do anything here. use `break` to exit loop.
}

That's the same thing as:

var enumerator = items.GetEnumerator();
while (enumerator.MoveNext())
{
    Console.WriteLine("The item: " + enumerator.Current);
}
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I'm not sure how to do that given the interfaces above. Should IVisitor has a Visit(T instance) method, not Visit(IVisitable<T> visitable)? Or should it take both an instance and a visitable? –  Jeff Jan 18 '11 at 11:14
    
check my update. –  jgauffin Jan 18 '11 at 11:19
    
But how can the visitor know the iteration should be stopped if only the visitable contains the list of items? I want to visit the entire graph until all nodes are visited. –  Jeff Jan 18 '11 at 11:26
    
then it should just keep returning true until it's not called anymore. –  jgauffin Jan 18 '11 at 11:29
    
Right, but who should be responsible for making sure the same node isn't visited twice? The visitable? Or should I just implement IEnumerable? Sounds more straightforward –  Jeff Jan 18 '11 at 11:34
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