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I want to specialize a template for STL's vector template arguments. Something like this:

// (1)
template <typename T>
class A
{
    ...
};

// (2)
template <>
class A<std::vector<> >
{
    ...
};

I don't care what is the type of the vector element. I would like to use it as follows:

A<int> a1; // Will use the general specialization
A<std::vector<int> > a2; // Will use the second specialization

In general I've been trying to define something similar to boost's type traits. Something like

template <class T> 
struct is_stl_vector 
{
    // Will be true if T is a vector, false otherwise
    static const bool value = ...; 
};

I cannot use template template (I think so) because it should compile for non-template types too. Is it possible at all?

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3  
std::vector is from the C++ Standard Library, not the STL. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 12:06
3  
No, @Antonio and @Nawaz. The term "STL" is misused by the C++ community. Strictly speaking, the STL is the original library. Parts of the C++ Standard Library were based on parts of the STL, but they are not one-and-the-same. It is true that, colloquially, people use the term "STL" to refer to those parts of the stdlib, but I feel it's important to know that they are indeed not the same. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 12:17
2  
@Nawaz: A library developed by Stepanov before the C++ language was standardised. Parts of the C++ standard library are very similar to it. Notably, nothing in the STL uses the std namespace. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 12:18
3  
And, yes, before you start, I know that there are books and resources that use the term to mean the standard library. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 12:19
7  
@Tomalak: can you think of a single reason why this is important? Or why it is at all relevant to this question? Plenty of people here know this, and just feel that trying to enforce this distinction is only causing confusion, and serves no purpose other than to prove that "I'm a more pedantic language lawyer than you". –  jalf Jan 18 '11 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can simply specialize like this:

// (2)
template <typename T, typename Alloc>
struct A<std::vector<T, Alloc> >
{...};
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2  
You'd get a +1 except that it's not this simple at all. See jpalecek's answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 12:07
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: actually I think there shouldn't be a problem with varying template parameter counts. That is because std::vector<T, Alloc> should use default template arguments, if there are any (this is different from using a template type in a template, where one would need the exact declaration). My compiler seems to agree with me by making this work even with template <typename T> struct A<std::vector<T> >{...}. Of course it wouldn't match those vectors which use non default arguments for further template parameters, but those are likely rare. Please correct me if I'm wrong here. –  Grizzly Jan 18 '11 at 12:13
    
@Tomalak: Actually, it is this simple. See my comment on jpalecek's answer. –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 12:46
    
@Grizzly: Oh, maybe. Have your +1 then. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 15:29
    
@Tomalak what he says is not true. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1469743/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 18 '11 at 17:38

The specialization goes like this:

// (2)
template <class T, class U>
class A<std::vector<T, U> >
{
    ...
};

Note that it is not guaranteed to work (and there si no other way that's guaranteed to work), because the template parameter count of std::vector may vary across implementations. In C++0x, this should be solvable using parameter packs.

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It is precisely because user code can break that a conforming std::vector cannot have other than type and allocator template parameters, even if they have default values. However, I think you'd be very hard pressed to find an implementation where the above code fails. –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 12:50
    
@Fred Nurk: chapter and verse? Note that the same applies to regular functions as well: float (*pSin)(float) = &std::sin breaks when float std::sin(float) has extra defaulted arguments. –  MSalters Jan 18 '11 at 13:29
1  
@MSalters: §17.4.4.4p2 lists the specific exemption for methods so additional parameters may be declared; I see no exemption for class template parameters, and thus, that GotW doesn't apply here. –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 17:12
3  
I think this answer is not true (last part). See stackoverflow.com/questions/1469743/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 18 '11 at 17:38
1  
@Alf: He means the answer that we are talking on, as he clarified in a comment on another answer to this same question. The subsequent term "See" made it clear that he was changing the focus of his comment from "this answer", to a separate resource i.e. his own answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 18 '11 at 20:35

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