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This is probably a pretty basic question, but I don't find the solution right now..

I have a PowerShell script that does some stuff using the script's current directory. So when inside that directory, running .\script.ps1 works correctly.

Now I want to call that script from a different directory without changing the referencing directory of the script. So I want to call ..\..\dir\script.ps1 and still want that script to behave as it was called from inside its directory.

How do I do that, or how do I modify a script so it can run from any directory?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 88 down vote accepted

Do you mean you want the script's own path so you can reference a file next to the script? Try this:

$scriptpath = $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path
$dir = Split-Path $scriptpath
Write-host "My directory is $dir"

You can get a lot of info from $MyInvocation and its properties.

If you want to reference a file in the current working directory, you can use Resolve-Path or Get-ChildItem:

$filepath = Resolve-Path "somefile.txt"

EDIT (based on comment from OP):

# temporarily change to the correct folder
Push-Location $folder

# do stuff, call ant, etc

# now back to previous directory
Pop-Location

There's probably other ways of achieving something similar using Invoke-Command as well.

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Hmm, okay, maybe I should have been a bit more clear about my script. Actually it is a script that calls ant with some parameters. So I have to call ant from that folder to ensure that it finds the configuration file correctly. Ideally I am looking for something to temporary change the execution directory locally within that script. –  poke Jan 18 '11 at 13:28
2  
Ah then in that case you will want Push-Location and Pop-Location –  JohnL Jan 18 '11 at 13:41
    
Yes, that's it, thank you :) –  poke Jan 18 '11 at 14:00
2  
careful about that, $MyInvocation is context sensitive, I usually do $ScriptPath = (Get-Variable MyInvocation -Scope Script).Value.MyCommand.Path which works from any sort of nesting or function –  Ion Todirel Jun 25 '13 at 8:19

If you're calling native apps, you need to worry about [Environment]::CurrentDirectory not about PowerShell's $PWD current directory. For some reason that escapes me, PowerShell does not set the process' current working directory when you Set-Location or Push-Location, so you need to make sure you do so if you're running applications (or cmdlets) that expect it to be set.

In a script, you can do this:

Push-Location $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path
[Environment]::CurrentDirectory = $PWD
##  Your Script Code ...
Pop-Location
[Environment]::CurrentDirectory = $PWD

There's no foolproof alternative to this. Many of us put a line in our prompt function to set [Environment]::CurrentDirectory ... but that doesn't help you when you're changing the location in a script.

Final note: $PWD isn't always a legal CurrentDirectory (you might CD into the registry provider for instance), so if you want to put this into your prompt, or into wrapper functions for the *-Location cmdlets, you need to use:

[Environment]::CurrentDirectory = Get-Location -PSProvider FileSystem
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It doesn't change the process working directory because of path providers: you might be CD'ing into the registry, a SQL database or an IIS hive etc... –  piers7 Nov 7 '13 at 8:42
1  
Yes. I know, that was the point of that last "Final note". They could have (as I do in my prompt function) updated it to the current location of the FileSystem provider, like every other shell in the world. –  Jaykul Nov 8 '13 at 16:18

I often used the following code to import a module which sit under the same directory as the running script. It will first get the directory from which powershell is running

$currentPath=Split-Path ((Get-Variable MyInvocation -Scope 0).Value).MyCommand.Path

import-module "$currentPath\sqlps.ps1"

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you want to set the -Scope to Script –  Ion Todirel Jun 25 '13 at 8:20

There are answers with big number of votes, but when I read your question, I thought you wanted to know the directory where the script is, not that where the script is running. You can get the information with powershell's auto variables

$PSScriptRoot - the directory where the script exists, not the target directory the script is running in
$PSCommandPath - the full path of the script

For example, I have $profile script that finds visual studio solution file and start it. I wanted to store the full path, once a solution file is started. But I wanted to save the file where the original script exists. So I used $PsScriptRoot.

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