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I have a series of Javascript calculations that (only under IE) show Infinity depending on user choices.

How does one stop the word 'Infinity' appearing and for example, show '0.0' instead?

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2 Answers

up vote 57 down vote accepted
if (result == Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY || result == Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY)
{
    // ...
}

You could possibly use the isFinite function instead, depending on how you want to treat NaN. isFinite returns false if your number is POSITIVE_INFINITY, NEGATIVE_INFINITY or NaN.

if (isFinite(result))
{
    // ...
}
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1  
Perfect - thanks! Homer. –  Homer_J Jan 18 '11 at 13:36
2  
Why use Number.(POSITIVE|NEGATIVE)_INFINITY instead of -?Infinity or -?1/0? –  Eli Grey Jan 18 '11 at 13:37
2  
@Eli: The global Infinity property isn't read-only which means that it can be redefined: For example, var x = 42; Infinity = 42; alert(x === Infinity); displays "true". (Admittedly that's an obscure case, and anyone who decides to redefine Infinity, NaN etc should expect odd things to happen.) –  LukeH Jan 18 '11 at 13:49
1  
@Eli: In my tests Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY and Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY are read-only (tested on Chrome8, FF3.6 and IE8). Using 1/0 works fine but it won't be so obvious to maintainers of your code what you're actually trying to test for. I agree that using isFinite is almost always the better way to do things -- that's why I mentioned it in my answer -- but only the OP can decide whether it meets their requirements. –  LukeH Jan 18 '11 at 15:58
3  
They're not read-only (read: non-configurable), they're just accessors with getters but no setters. You can redefine them with Object.defineProperty and __defineGetter__. Infinity, on the other hand, is non-configurable in strict mode. –  Eli Grey Jan 19 '11 at 20:12
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A simple n === n+1 or n === n/0 works:

function isInfinite(n) {
  return n === n/0;
}

Be aware that the native isFinite() coerces inputs to numbers. isFinite([]) and isFinite(null) are both true for example.

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