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Why is the exception thrown from getA() not caught?

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base{

protected:
    int a;
public:
    Base() { a=34; }
    Base(int i){ a = i; }
    virtual ~Base() { if(a<0) throw a; }
    virtual int getA()
    {
        if(a < 0) { throw a;}
    }
};

int main()
{
    try
    {
        Base b(-25);
        cout << endl << b.getA();
    }
    catch (int) {
        cout << endl << "Illegal initialization";
    }
}

EDIT:

I understand what you are saying about stack unwinding.
If I change Base to the below, I now get my "Illegal initialization" debug to print. Why am I not getting a call to terminate() any longer?

Base() { a=34; }
Base(int i){ a = i;  if(a<0) throw a;}
virtual ~Base() { if(a<0) throw a; }
virtual int getA()
{
    return a;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

After you call getA() the first exception is thrown, so-called stack unwinding starts and the object gets destroyed. While the object is being destroyed its destructor throws another exception that escapes the destructor's body and (since that happens during stack unwinding) this leads to terminate() being called immediately by the C++ runtime and your program terminates.

In the second snippet you submitted the exception is thrown in the constructor, so the constructor doesn't complete and the destructor is never called (since destructors are only called for fully-constructed objects), hence no chance for terminate() call.

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7  
...and hence why you should make it a habit to never throw in a destructor... –  Nim Jan 18 '11 at 13:46
7  
@Nim: Not to "never throw", but rather to "never let it propagate outside the destructor". –  sharptooth Jan 18 '11 at 13:56
    
Last question. How should the first snippet be modified in order to catch destructors exception? –  thikonom Jan 18 '11 at 14:36
    
@Nim: Be careful of the phrase never throw in a destructor. As the destructor may hide the throwing of exceptions by calling methods/functions that potentially throw. So the trick is exceptions in a destructor are fine, as long as they do not escape. –  Loki Astari Jan 18 '11 at 14:37
    
@Display Name: Just don't let exceptions escape the destructor. –  Loki Astari Jan 18 '11 at 14:38
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terminate() is no longer called because you're throwing the exception in the constructor now. So the object is not actually created. Hence the destructor is never called.

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