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In general terms of java, there are listeners & handlers for events.
I mean I use them unknowingly, just whichever is available in the API.

My question is, in what case do we use listeners and in what case do we use handlers for events?

What's the difference between them? Characteristics??

I've searched for reasons and I couldn't find a proper explanation for Java.

Thanks in advance.

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10 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This blog post has a nice summary.

http://lemnik.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/gwts-new-event-model-handlers-in-gwt-16/

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URLs should be included in an answer for further reading only. This answer appears to rely heavily on the content of a URL and would benefit from a summary of the URL being included in the answer. –  Duncan Jan 28 at 15:53
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I usually use the terms as follows:

A listener is an object that listens, (and takes actions) upon certain events. I.e. it "listens" for events. Cf. the observer pattern.

Example: The MouseListener in the Java API.

A handler is an object that handles certain things that the client class don't want to deal with. I.e. it "handles" events. A typical scenario is that I provide a handler for a specific event/task as an argument to a constructor.

Example: The MemoryHandler in the Java API.


A concrete difference would be that you can have multiple listeners (just call addXxxxListener several times) while you're only supposed to have a single handler.

(Note that this is my personal terminology and I'm not sure it is commonly accepted. Actually, I even suppose some people use the two terms interchangeably.)

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The most basic difference is the association

  • Listener is associated with Event Source (Ex: key board)
  • Handler is associated with an Event (Ex: keydown)

Generally speaking, there will only one central Handler Manager which manages all the events, while in case of Listener each Entity which wants to listen, will have to manage their own Collection of listeners

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This is the way I see it:

A listener watches for an event to be fired. For example, a KeyListener waits for KeyEvents, a MessageListener waits for messages to arrive on a queue and so on.

The handler is responsible for dealing with the event. Normally, listeners and handlers go hand-in-hand. For example, the KeyListener tells the ExitHandler that "the letter Q was pressed" and the handler performs logic such as cleaning up resources and exiting the application gracefully. Similary a ButtonClickListener would tell the same ExitHandler that the "Exit button was clicked". So, in this case you have two different events, two different listeners but a single handler.

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A listener, listens for events which are data value objects which describe an event. When the event occurred and the order of events is often important. Pressing key '0' followed by '1' is different to '1' and '0'.

A handler, handles a complex object e.g. a new Socket connection. The handler might process the object for any length of time. The time of object creation and order is not so important. A connection from client0 or client1 can happen in any order.

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They're conceptually the same thing - an object that performs some action in response to a UI event. Generally, in Swing, these objects are called "handlers" at the look-and-feel level (for handling low-level widget events), and "listeners" at the more abstract UI level (where you'll be implementing your application logic).

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A listener is an object that is notified when an event occurs, and it has 2 major requirements- 1-it must have been registered with one or more sources to receive notifications about specific types of event 2-it must implements methods to receive and process these notifications. Handler is responsible for dealing with events.

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To my mind, the most important difference is fact that we use listeners per event's source, in contrary to handler, which is per event type.

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I think the difference is subtle because a concrete Listener is an event-handler too or at least has a method that can be considered an event-handler. That is, a concrete Listener handles or manages the reaction to the event after receiving an event object(from the event-source) with all the usefull informations about the event just occurred(on the event-source). As this Listener has to implement an xxxListener interface that forces him to implement at least one method that is in turn executed by the event-source object when the event occurs, so the Listener itself can be considered an handler and more precisely, the method of the Listener interface implemented by the Listener object can be considered the real event-handler. So i view the event-handler as just the code that is executed in reaction to an event. This is different from a Listener object that is an element of a more abstract concept such as an Observer design pattern. This is my personal view of the subject.

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It is semantics.

  • Listener is interface.
  • Adaptor is class that implements specific interface and provides empty implementation for its methods. This helps if you do not have to implement all methods of interface.
  • Handler implements several interfaces or delegates calls to several interfaces.
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I wouldn't say that a listener necessarily is an interface. The BasicButtonListener for instance is a concrete class. –  aioobe Jan 18 '11 at 14:54
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