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I'm new to scala and trying to write a function literal that check whether a given integer is odd or not. my first attempt is:

val isOdd = (x:Int) => (x & 1) == 1

it works great, and, since the parameter x only appears once within this function literal, I'm tempted to use the "_" notation to simplify it further, like this:

val isOdd = ((_:Int) & 1 ) == 1

however this time the compiler complains :

warning: comparing a fresh object using `==' will always yield false
val isOdd = ((_:Int) & 1 ) == 1

what does this warning mean? why does the compiler recognize ((_ :Int) & 1) as fresh object rather than a bitwise operation that results in a value? is there any way to write this function literal using the "_" notation?

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Just use: val odd = ! even (_:Int) –  user unknown May 28 '12 at 17:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The problem is basically that Scala needs to tell the difference between

val isOdd = ((_:Int) & 1 ) == 1

where you want everything to the right of the equals sign to be a lambda, and

val result = collection.map( _ + 1 )

where you want only the stuff inside the parentheses to be a lambda

Scala has decided that when you use the underscore to create a lambda, that it's going to pick the innermost set of parentheses as the boundaries of that lambda. There's one exception: (_:Int) doesn't count as the innermost parentheses because its purpose is only to group they type declaration with the _ placeholder.

Hence:

val isOdd = ((_:Int) & 1 ) == 1
            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
            this is the lambda

val result = collection.map( _ + 1 )
                            ^^^^^^^
                            this is the lambda

val result = collection.map(( _ + 1) / 2)
                            ^^^^^^^^
                            this is the lambda
                            and the compiler can't infer the type of the _

val result = somemap.map(( _ + 1) / 2 * _)
                         ^^^^^^^^
                         this is an inner lambda with one parameter
                         and the compiler can't infer the type of the _
                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                         this is an outer lambda with one parameter

This last case lets you do things like

_.map(_ + 1)

and have that get translated into

x => x.map( y=> y + 1 )
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1  
+1 for awesome use of the caret key (and a good answer!) –  Andy Jan 18 '11 at 18:24
    
thx for clarifying the rules about the boundary of the lambda expression! –  hind_d Jan 19 '11 at 7:26

Only slightly cheating:

val isOdd = (_: Int) % 2 == 1

:-)

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2  
+1 It's not cheating. In fact, I maintain that using an & for this is premature optimization. The % form is clearer, and any compiler (or maybe the JIT) worth it's salt will see % 2 and change it to & 1 if it's actually faster in that operating environment. –  Ken Bloom Jan 19 '11 at 1:01
    
I agree that in general we should leave this sort of optimizations to compilers; but here i actually want to understand the rationale behind this lambda thing. again thx for clarifying the parentheses rule regarding lambda :) –  hind_d Jan 19 '11 at 8:02
    
@KenBloom I would maintain that using the best algorithm for a job isn't premature optimization, it's just good programming, and I get tired of people using this justification for writing slow code (generally speaking, this is a micro-example where the difference is probably negligible). That you can accomplish it more elegantly with another mechanism has everything to do with style, and nothing to do with optimization. –  PlexQ Dec 18 '12 at 18:53
    
Just be aware this doesn't work for negative numbers, whereas & does. –  Karl Bielefeldt May 14 at 19:42

There you go:

val isOdd = ((_: Int) & 1) andThen (1 ==)
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+1 for the brilliant idea of function composition :) –  hind_d Jan 19 '11 at 7:31

What Scala is doing is this:

  • it sees ((_:Int) & 1 ) and creates an object of type (Int) => Int, that is, a function.
  • it then applies the comparison operator == to compare this function to the value 1

A function is not equal to the value 1. Therefore the result is false, so your code is equivalent to:

val isOdd = false

What you could do is create another anonymous function that does the == 1 part of your computation. This is ugly:

val isOdd = ((_: Int) & 1)(_: Int) == 1

This is equivalent to the more verbose (and perhaps easier to understand):

val isOdd = (x: Int) => 1 == ((_: Int) & 1)(x)
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5  
I don't recommend either of these solutions -- they're both more complicated, and they both create an extra, unnecessary lambda. Stick with val isOdd = (x:Int) => (x & 1) == 1 –  Ken Bloom Jan 18 '11 at 15:16
1  
Sure! But the OP asked specifically if there was any way he could write his "isOdd" lambda using only "_". I don't think we are discussing good style here. –  Bruno Reis Jan 18 '11 at 16:23
    
You missed val isOdd = ((_: Int) & 1) andThen (_ == 1). :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 18 '11 at 18:57
    
Yeah! Fortunately @Debilski posted this one! –  Bruno Reis Jan 18 '11 at 19:35

A different approach

val isOdd = (_:Int).&(1) == 1
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