Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I tried to declare a class as shown below

class Outer{
    private final class Inner{
      public static final String s1 = new String("123");
      public static final byte[] bytes = new byte[]{0x00, 0x01};

      public static final String s2 = "123";
      public static final byte byte1 = 0x02;
    }
} 

In the above code s1 and bytes wont compile but s2 and byte1 compile. If I put the whole constant declaration in outer class it works fine. what am i missing. Any help?

share|improve this question
1  
i bet the s2 line would have been public static final String s2 = "123"; –  guido Jan 18 '11 at 14:59
    
@Cadrian, @Guido Sorry, Copy paste error, Updated the question –  Manoj Jan 18 '11 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Read Java Language Specification, 3rd ed, §8.1.3.

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static. Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces.

This is why you cannot declare new public static final String s1 = new String("123");.

Inner classes may not declare static members, unless they are compile-time constant fields (§15.28).

This explains why you can do public static final String s2 = "123";

A static nested class can have static members.

share|improve this answer
    
One should never say new String("123"), anyway: it's redundant, slow, and a waste of memory as you declare two variables and only use one. Just use the string literal: "123". –  CajunLuke Jan 18 '11 at 15:27
    
Can you explain why JLS has this restriction? –  Dheeraj V.S. Apr 10 '12 at 6:50

cf Java Language specification, second edition, §8.1.2

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static. Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces

share|improve this answer

Inner classes were designed to work in the context of the outer class, I think static variables would break this rule.

8.1.2 Inner Classes and Enclosing Instances

An inner class is a nested class that is not explicitly or implicitly declared static. Inner classes may not declare static initializers (§8.7) or member interfaces. Inner classes may not declare static members, unless they are compile-time constant fields (§15.28).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.