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I'm writing a command line application and would like the user to be able to enter numbers as individual numbers or as a range. So, for example:

$ myapp -n 3,4,5,6

or

$ myapp -n 3-6

I would like my app to put these into a Python list e.g., [3, 4, 5, 6] I'm using optparse, but am not sure how to create the list from these two styles of inputs. Some example code would be great.

EDIT

I would like to be able to enter multiple ranges too:

$ myapp -n 22-27, 51-64
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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/4248399/… –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 16:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
import argparse

def parse_range(astr):
    result = set()
    for part in astr.split(','):
        x = part.split('-')
        result.update(range(int(x[0]), int(x[-1]) + 1))
    return sorted(result)

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument('-n', type=parse_range)
args = parser.parse_args()
print(args.n)

yields

% script.py -n 3-6
[3, 4, 5, 6]

% script.py -n 3,6
[3, 6]

% script.py -n 22-27,51-64 
[22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64]
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1  
Thanks. This seems to work perfectly for my requirements. –  normski Jan 18 '11 at 16:21
    
One more thing I would like to be able to enter multiple ranges e.g., myapp 22-27, 51-64 –  normski Jan 18 '11 at 16:24
1  
@normski: Right. The above code can handle it, as long as you don't put a space between 22-27, and 51-64. (That way the entire string is loaded into opt.n.) –  unutbu Jan 18 '11 at 16:26
    
So it can :-) Thank you. –  normski Jan 18 '11 at 16:31
1  
+1 Sweet solution. –  Skurmedel Jan 18 '11 at 16:44

If you have the n-arg in a string you can do:

def f(s):
    if '-' in s:
        i = s.index('-')
        return range(*map(int, s.split('-')))
    return map(int, s.split(','))

Some examples:

In [3]: s = '1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6'

In [4]: f(s)
Out[4]: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

In [5]: f('3-6')
Out[5]: [3, 4, 5]

In [6]: f('3-16-3')
Out[6]: [3, 6, 9, 12, 15]
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I like this solution. I would like to see some input validation, that's all really :) It would be quite suboptimal if the input list is gigantic, but I suspect it's not. –  Skurmedel Jan 18 '11 at 16:09
2  
This does not include the upper boundary either. –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 16:10

You can define your argument and use optparse callback to process your input before saving it :

from optparse import OptionParser

parser = OptionParser()

def create_range_callback(option, opt, value, parser):
    i, j = map(int, value.split('-'))
    setattr(parser.values, option.dest, range(i, j+1))

parser.add_option("-r", "--range", action="callback", 
                  callback=create_range_callback, 
                  type="string", dest='list')

(options, args) = parser.parse_args()

print options.list

doing now :

python2.7 test.py -r 1-5

Output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
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Use Python's range function. Parse your user's input, splitting it by the '-' character, and then pass those parameters to range.

Your code might look something like this:

parameters = input.split('-')
completeRange = range(int(parameters[0]), int(parameters[1]))

If they enter individual numbers, you can just parse that into a list quite easily.

share|improve this answer
1  
This won't include the upper boundary, as desired. –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 16:10
1  
Then just add 1 to the second parameter... –  Mike Cialowicz Jan 18 '11 at 16:11

You can use optparse library.

Example:

from optparse import OptionParser

opt_parser = OptionParser(version="%prog 0.1")
opt_parser.usage = '%prog [options]\n\nTCP protocol reengineering tool'

# Options
opt_parser.add_option('-n', default="1,2,3")
(options, args) = opt_parser.parse_args()

list = []
for s in options.n.split(","):
    list.append(int(s))
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