Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying a very simple case using a Python library called pyBrain and I can't get it to work. There is likely to be a very simple reason, so, I hope someone can help!

1) A simple XOR works fine.

2) Classifying the led's displayed on a digital clock to the numerical output value works fine.

e.g.

[ 1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.] => [ 0.]
[ 0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  1.  0.] => [ 1.] 
[ 1.  0.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.] => [ 2.] 
[ 1.  0.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.] => [ 3.] 
[ 0.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  0.] => [ 4.] 
[ 1.  1.  0.  1.  0.  1.  1.] => [ 5.] 
[ 1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.  1.] => [ 6.] 
[ 1.  0.  1.  0.  0.  1.  0.] => [ 7.] 
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.  1.] => [ 8.] 
[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.] => [ 9.] 

3) Classifying a numerical value to the led output to drive a digital display doesn't work.

e.g.

[ 0.] => [ 1.  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  1.] 

etc etc (as above but reversed).

I'm using a simple linear activator with 10 inputs, 1 output and i've tried >12 neurons in the hidden layer.

My confusion is that, shouldn't the network be able to remember the pattern with 10 neurons in the hidden layer?

I'm sure there is something obvious I'm missing, so, please feel free to enlighten my stupidity!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A linear activation is fine when you're doing regression (single output node representing a range of values) but for classification (binary outputs representing matches) you're better off using an activation that limits the range of values. Something like a sigmoid or tanh.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, is this in the hidden layer, output layer or both? –  Liam Jan 18 '11 at 16:54
    
I would recommend both. For regression you also can use sigmoid/tanh activation in the hidden layer since it adds non-linearity to the function approximation. For the output layer I would normally pick linear for regression, and a squashing function for classification. –  darkcanuck Jan 18 '11 at 17:06
    
Thanks, that seems a lot better :-) –  Liam Jan 18 '11 at 17:41

I think rather than SO, MetaOptimize might help you more.

I had taken only an introductory class in ML. But from what I remember, neural networks work for many problems, but they are like black boxes. If they do not work, it is difficult to determine why they are not working. Specifically, there are no specific rules as to the number of nodes in the hidden layer (there are rules of thumb for some problems).

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, I've just reread this and actually had a look at metaoptimize. I've never seen this site and it looks really interesting. Thanks :-) –  Liam Jan 19 '11 at 17:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.