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I'm serializing and deserializing an object (TComponent descendant) using the example in the ComponentToString section in the Delphi help file. This is so I can store the object in a VARCHAR field in the database.

When I need to instantiate a new instance of my class from a string stored in the database, can I do that using a constructor of the form CreateFromString(AOwner: TComponent; AData: String)? Or do I have to use a non-class method that returns an instance of my component class?

If I can use the constructor version, how to I "map" the return value of ReadComponent to the "self" that is being created by the constructor?

Here's the deserialization example from the help file:

function StringToComponentProc(Value: string): TComponent;
var
  StrStream:TStringStream;
  BinStream: TMemoryStream;
begin
  StrStream := TStringStream.Create(Value);
  try
    BinStream := TMemoryStream.Create;
    try
      ObjectTextToBinary(StrStream, BinStream);
      BinStream.Seek(0, soFromBeginning);
      Result:= BinStream.ReadComponent(nil);
    finally
      BinStream.Free;
    end;
  finally
    StrStream.Free;
  end;
end;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In general, yes, you can make a constructor deserialize a string and use that information to initialize the new instance. A trivial example of that would be a class with a single Integer field. Pass a string to the constructor and have the constructor call StrToInt and initialize the field with the result.

But if the only function you have for deserialization is one that also creates the instance, then you cannot use that from the constructor because then you'll end up with two instances when you only wanted one. There's no way for a constructor to say, "Never mind; don't construct an instance after all. I already got one somewhere else."

However, that's not the situation you're in. As you should know, TStream.ReadComponent allows you to create the instance yourself. It only instantiates the class if you haven't already given it an instance to use. You should be able to write your constructor like this:

constructor TLarryComponent.CreateFromString(const AData: string);
var
  StrStream, BinStream: TStream;
begin
  Create(nil);
  StrStream := TStringStream.Create(AData);
  try
    BinStream := TMemoryStream.Create;
    try
      ObjectTextToBinary(StrStream, BinStream);
      BinStream.Position := 0;
      BinStream.ReadComponent(Self);
    finally
      BinStream.Free;
    end;
  finally
    StrStream.Free;
  end;
end;

There we're passing the current object, designated by Self, to ReadComponent. The stream will ignore the class name stored in the stream and assume that the current object is of the correct class.

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2  
Is it possible there's a small bug in your implementation? I think it should be Create(nil); not inherited Create(nil);. With "inherited" you miss creating any field storage and properties that are introduced by TLarryComponent. –  Larry Lustig Jan 18 '11 at 19:06
1  
You're right. I was thinking ReadComponent would take care of that, but I realize now there's no way it could. –  Rob Kennedy Jan 18 '11 at 19:31
    
Now working perfectly and providing an elegant solution to my problem. –  Larry Lustig Jan 19 '11 at 3:21

You can do this by a class (static) method, but not via a constructor.
Delphis' constructors are called by compiler intrinsic on the just-created instance, which is already partially initialized (it's of the desired class and instance/field storage is zeroed-out).

If you see the source of TStream.ReadComponent, you'll find that the components' real class is read from the source stream at first, then an empty instance is constructed and filled by RTTI from the stream and returned as the result. Which means:

To use TStream.ReadComponent, you'll need to register your class to Delphis' streaming system via RegisterClass.

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Thanks Viktor. This answer contains an important note about RegisterClass which probably would have had me scratching my head for an hour if you hadn't thought to point it out. –  Larry Lustig Jan 19 '11 at 3:23

Use a static class function instead of a constructor:

type
  TYourClass = class(TComponent)
  public
    class function CreateFromString(AOwner: TComponent; AData: String): TYourClass; static;
  end;

implementation

class function TYourClass.CreateFromString(AOwner: TComponent; AData: String): TYourClass;
begin
   Result := (StringToComponentProc(AData) as TYourClass);
   if AOwner <> nil then
     AOwner.InsertComponent(Result);
end;

The AOwner part could be a problem though, since TStream.ReadComponent has no parameter for the owner.

There is another so question about that problem:

How can I specify the Owner of component read from a Delphi TStream?

Edit: I've updated the code sample to include the owner, too.

Note that inserting into the component list of the owner requires a unique or empty Name for the component that is being inserted.

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Actually, the owner issue is not a problem. I'm making this a TComponent descendant only to gain access to the automatic streaming abilities. In fact there's no visible representation of the object, I will not be using it at design time, and I will be managing its lifetime in code. So I can leave the owner nil. –  Larry Lustig Jan 18 '11 at 16:58

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