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In C++ it is possible to use the static keyword within a translation unit to affect the visibility of a symbol (either variable or function declaration).

In n3092, this was deprecated:

Annex D.2 [depr.static]
The use of the static keyword is deprecated when declaring objects in namespace scope (see 3.3.6).

In n3225, this has been removed.

The only article I could find is somewhat informal.

It does underline though, that for compatibility with C (and the ability to compile C-programs as C++) the deprecation is annoying. However, compiling a C program directly as C++ can be a frustrating experience already, so I am unsure if it warrants consideration.

Does anyone know why it was changed ?

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You declare objects at namespace scope in C? –  Etienne de Martel Jan 18 '11 at 16:44
    
heh, thx, found where to get hold of it at. Tried to delete comment but you beat me there. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 18 '11 at 17:10
    
Question arose from stackoverflow.com/questions/4725204/… –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 17:28
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This also gives the C++ Committee the opportunity to unundeprecate something in the next version of the Standard :-) –  James McNellis Feb 10 '11 at 22:48
    
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3 Answers 3

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Because they noticed that deprecation of static doesn't really make sense. It won't ever be removed from C++, and it's still useful because you don't need the boilerplate code you need with unnamed namespaces, if you just want to declare a function or object with internal linkage.

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Thanks for the link, didn't thought of consulting the defects :/ –  Matthieu M. Jan 18 '11 at 18:47
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Well, it seems deprecation would encourage people to use unnamed namespaces instead, which would be a good thing. –  sbi Feb 23 '11 at 16:04
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@sbi Why would that be a good thing? –  nbt Apr 26 '11 at 19:41
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@unaperson: If for no other reason, then because unnamed namespaces provides the same mechanism for making variables, constants, functions, and types internal to their TU. static class ... , OTOH, won't work. –  sbi Apr 27 '11 at 6:57
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@nbt: Because you can't use static symbols as template arguments and because many newbies would find static easier to use and then are untempted to try out <functional> and <algorithm> et al. Just a quick thought. –  phresnel Jul 4 '11 at 13:48
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I will try to answer your question, although it is an old question, and it does not look very important (it really is not very important in itself), and it has received quite good answers already. The reason I want to answer it is that it relates to fundamental issues of standard evolution and language design when the language is based on an existing language: when should language features be deprecated, removed, or changed in incompatible ways?

In C++ it is possible to use the static keyword within a translation unit to affect the visibility of a symbol (either variable or function declaration).

The linkage actually.

In n3092, this was deprecated:

Deprecation indicates:

  • The intent to remove some feature in the future; this does not mean that deprecated features will be removed in the next standard revision, or that they must be removed "soon", or at all. And non-deprecated features may be removed in the next standard revision.
  • A formal attempt to discourage its use.

The later point is important. Although there is never a formal promise that your program won't be broken, sometimes silently, by the next standard, the committee should try to avoid breaking "reasonable" code. Deprecation should tell programmers that it is unreasonable to depend on some feature.

It does underline though, that for compatibility with C (and the ability to compile C-programs as C++) the deprecation is annoying. However, compiling a C program directly as C++ can be a frustrating experience already, so I am unsure if it warrants consideration.

It is very important to preserve a C/C++ common subset, especially for header files. Of course, static global declarations are declarations of symbol with internal linkage and this not very useful in a header file.

But the issue is never just compatibility with C, it's compatibility with existing C++: there are tons of existing valid C++ programs that use static global declarations. This code is not just formally legal, it is sound, as it uses a well-defined language feature the way it is intended to be used.

Just because there is no now a "better way" (according to some) to do something does not make the programs written the old way "bad" or "unreasonable". The ability of using the static keyword on declarations of objects and functions at global scope is well understood in both C and C++ communities, and most often used correctly.

In a similar vein, I am not going to change C-style casts to double to static_cast<double> just because "C-style casts are bad", as static_cast<double> adds zero information and zero safety.

The idea that whenever a new way to something is invented, all programmers would rush to rewrite their existing well-defined working code is just crazy. If you want to remove all the inherited C ugliness and problems, you don't change C++, you invent a new programming language. Half-removing one use of static hardly makes C++ less C-ugly.

Code changes need a justification, and "old is bad" is never a justification for code changes.

Breaking language changes need a very strong justification. Making the language very slightly simpler is never a justification for a breaking change.

The reasons given why static is bad are just remarkably weak, and it isn't even clear why not both objects and functions declarations are deprecated together - giving them different treatment hardly makes C++ simpler or more orthogonal.

So, really, it is a sad story. Not because of the practical consequences it had: it had exactly zero practical consequences. But because it shows a clear lack of common sense from the ISO committee.

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As you yourself points out, the point of deprecating it is to discourage it's use. Yet you make no argument that discouraging its use is wrong. I certainly hope that nobody's out there encouraging people to use namespace-scoped static declarations over anonymous namespaces. Not unless they specifically need to cross-compile C. –  Nicol Bolas Dec 10 '11 at 22:22
    
I don't care that much about people using global scope static or anonymous namespaces, I am not encouraging or discouraging either. My point is that if you really want to discourage people to use anonymous namespaces you have to give them good argument. In practice, I believe that in most implementations entities declared in an unnamed namespace are symbols exported with a random name, thus growing the export table. Entities declared as static, OTOH, are not exported in any way. Thus many people choose, based on that observation, to use static. –  curiousguy Dec 11 '11 at 23:49
    
"As you yourself points out, the point of deprecating it is to discourage it's use." The point of discouraging its use is that it might disappear some day. My point is that namespace-scope static won't disappear ever, so it's wrong to deprecate it. "Yet you make no argument that discouraging its use is wrong." I have seen no convincing argument that shows that use of namespace-scope static is "wrong". Deprecating it just to discourage its use is wrong, because no one actually believes it's going to disappear, and because it doesn't convince people that using it is "wrong". –  curiousguy Dec 11 '11 at 23:57
    
"I certainly hope that nobody's out there encouraging people to use namespace-scoped static declarations over anonymous namespaces." Some people think that static is better, and encourage its use over anonymous namespaces. My point isn't that either one is better than the other; my point is 1) that no feature (static, anon namespaces) is "wrong". 2) that deprecating a useful, well-defined, widely used feature that isn't going to go way - ever - is wrong. Doing that lowers the credibility of the C++ committee (and it is already quite low). –  curiousguy Dec 12 '11 at 0:05
    
The whole language will "disappear some day". Let's deprecate C++. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 17 '13 at 18:24
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Deprecated or not, removing this language feature would break existing codes and annoy people.

The whole static deprecation thing was just wishful thinking along the lines of "anonymous namespaces are better than static" and "references are better pointers". Lol.

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"References are better pointers"? No, smart pointers are smarter pointers. You can't use references for memory allocated from the heap, err, free store. –  Dan Breslau Jan 18 '11 at 17:06
    
Sorry, I forgot to end it with an ironic smiley. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Jan 18 '11 at 17:09
    
@Dan: That's exactly what this answer says: "wishful thinking" along a similar faulty line of thought. Unnamed namespaces are an important feature, just as global-scope-static is, though for slightly different reasons, and even though they have some overlap in applicability. –  Fred Nurk Jan 18 '11 at 17:26
    
@Fred, @Maxim: Sorry if I misunderstood, or if my memory's faulty. But I don't categorize "references are better pointers" as being equivalent to "anonymous namespaces are better than static" as a case of wishful thinking. I'm well aware of the attempt at making the latter stick, but I don't remember anyone making a serious proposal to replace pointers with references. Again, maybe it's my own awareness that's lacking. –  Dan Breslau Jan 19 '11 at 1:09
    
@Dan: I do occasionally see people on SO and elsewhere that try to push "references are better pointers", but it of course didn't have the serious effort to remove it from the language that the other did. I think you simply misunderstood, because I can't see that Maxim was ever espousing it himself. *shrug* –  Fred Nurk Jan 19 '11 at 3:29
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