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I have a variable I want to set depending on the values in three booleans. The most straight-forward way is an if statement followed by a series of elifs:

if a and b and c:
    name = 'first'
elif a and b and not c:
    name = 'second'
elif a and not b and c:
    name = 'third'
elif a and not b and not c:
    name = 'fourth'
elif not a and b and c:
    name = 'fifth'
elif not a and b and not c:
    name = 'sixth'
elif not a and not b and c:
    name = 'seventh'
elif not a and not b and not c:
    name = 'eighth'

This is a bit awkward, and I'm wondering if there's a more Pythonic way to handle this problem. A couple of ideas come to mind.

  1. Dictionary hack:

    name = {a and b and c: 'first',
            a and b and not c: 'second',
            a and not b and c: 'third',
            a and not b and not c: 'fourth',
            not a and b and c: 'fifth',
            not a and b and not c: 'sixth',
            not a and not b and c: 'seventh',
            not a and not b and not c: 'eighth'}[True]
    

I call it a hack because I'm not too wild about seven of the keys being False and overriding each other.

  1. And/or magic

    name = (a and b and c and 'first' or
            a and b and not c and 'second' or
            a and not b and c and 'third' or
            a and not b and not c and 'fourth' or
            not a and b and c and 'fifth' or
            not a and b and not c and 'sixth' or
            not a and not b and c and 'seventh' or
            not a and not b and not c and 'eighth')
    

This works because Python ands and ors return the last value to be evaluated, but you have to know that in order to understand this otherwise bizarre code.

None of these three options is very satisfying. What do you recommend?

share|improve this question
2  
Another drawback of #2: It fail when one of the values to be mapped to is falsy (e.g. 0). –  delnan Jan 18 '11 at 17:24
2  
+1 for a practical code golf :) –  Tim Post Jan 20 '11 at 16:12
1  
it seems some have read 'first', 'second' as arbitrary placeholders, while other read them as the actual strings you need to produce. I'm curious - could you please shed light on this? –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 22 '11 at 19:11
    
They are placeholders indicating a general case. –  exupero Jan 28 '11 at 20:34

10 Answers 10

You can think of a, b, and c as three bits that when put together form a number between 0 and 7. Then, you can have an array of the values ['first', 'second', ... 'eighth'] and use the bit value as an offset into the array. This would just be two lines of code (one to assemble the bits into a value from 0-7, and one to lookup the value in the array).

Here's the code:

nth = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
nth[(a and 4 or 0) | (b and 2 or 0) | (c and 1 or 0)]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 exactly what I was thinking: stackoverflow.com/questions/4726949/… :P But It took me a while to know how to write the ternary operator in python. I used something like this for this FizzBuzz solution in Java : rosettacode.org/wiki/FizzBuzz#Using_an_array :) –  OscarRyz Jan 18 '11 at 17:40
3  
Couldn't you drop the or 0 parts? –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 17:40
    
Sven, probably so. My Python is a bit rusty. :-) –  Clint Miller Jan 18 '11 at 17:42
4  
@Sven it is, and yes, that's possible: nth[(a and 4)|( b and 2)|(c and 1)] works well. –  OscarRyz Jan 18 '11 at 17:46
1  
+1 for karnaughing this stuff. –  Agos Jan 19 '11 at 0:28

How about using a dict?

name = {(True, True, True): "first", (True, True, False): "second",
        (True, False, True): "third", (True, False, False): "fourth",
        (False, True, True): "fifth", (False, True, False): "sixth",
        (False, False, True): "seventh", (False, False, False): "eighth"}

print name[a,b,c] # prints "fifth" if a==False, b==True, c==True etc.
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 exactly what I did when confronted with something very similar. With a comment # first boolean means x, second means y, third means z of course. (You got the lookup syntax wrong in the last line, should be print name[(a,b,c)] or print name[a,b,c]). –  delnan Jan 18 '11 at 17:21
1  
@delnan: Thanks, I noticed that, too - and I hadn't thought about dropping the parens around the tuple. Nice that it works without them. Tuple packing/unpacking, huh? –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 18 '11 at 17:27
    
No, it's not tuple unpacking. Tuples don't need parentheses, except some ambiguity arises by omitting them. –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 17:30
12  
+1 Simple is better than complex. Encoding the bits as a int may seem clever, but in the end it's just a unnecessary additional step. –  Jochen Ritzel Jan 18 '11 at 17:58
2  
@OzcarRyz if it grows, I'd consider binary to generate keys when building the table, but leave the lookup structure as is. It's really the natural data structure for this. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 18 '11 at 19:23

Maybe not much better, but how about

results = ['first', 'second', 'third', 'fourth', 
           'fifth', 'sixth', 'seventh', 'eighth']
name = results[((not a) << 2) + ((not b) << 1) + (not c)]
share|improve this answer
    
that doesn't really work, does it. –  SilentGhost Jan 18 '11 at 17:25
    
@SilentGhost: I always get confused with operator precedence -- added the missing parens :) –  Sven Marnach Jan 18 '11 at 17:28
2  
I like this a lot. Don't understand the downvote... –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 18 '11 at 17:30
2  
Not my downvote, but it's hard to read and highly magick. I'd definitely recommend against this if anyone else is ever supposed to read the code. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 18 '11 at 17:33
2  
Strange, this reads fine to me. I think it is clever, but not overly clever or dangerous sorcery. +1. –  Tim Post Jan 20 '11 at 16:11

if a,b,c are really booleans:

li = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
name = li[a*4 + b*2 + c]

if they are not booleans:

li = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
a,b,c = map(bool,(a,b,c))
name = li[a*4 + b*2 + c]

idea from Clint Miller

share|improve this answer

Since your getting all the combinations, you could create an index based on the values like this:

def value(a,b,c ): 
   values = ['8th','7th','6th','5th','4th','3rd','2nd','1st']
   index = ( 4 if a else 0 ) + ( 2 if b else 0 ) + ( 1 if c else 0 )
   return values[index]

if __name__ == "__main__":
   print value(True,  True,  True )
   print value(True,  True,  False )
   print value(True,  False, True )
   print value(True,  False, False )
   print value(False, True,  True )
   print value(False, True,  False)
   print value(False, False, True )
   print value(False, False, False)

output:

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
share|improve this answer

What about nested ifs - it means you don't have to check everything several times and reads clearer to me (although maybe not quite as clever as some of the other answers):

if a:
    if b:
        if c:
            name="first"
        else:
            name="second"
    else:
        if c:
            name="third"
        else:
            name="fourth"
else:
    if b:
        if c:
            name="fifth"
        else:
            name="sixth"
    else:
        if c:
            name="seventh"
        else:
            name="eighth"
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: not clever, but the most readable. at least you understand what's going on without scratching your head. –  Adrien Plisson Jan 18 '11 at 20:02
    
I'm not downvoting, but I think it's horrible. I think clint's solution plus a good comment is the best –  Lacrymology Jan 18 '11 at 21:35
    
Flat is better than nested. –  alpha123 Jan 18 '11 at 22:15

Another option would be to create a helper function:

def first_true(*args):
    true_vals = (arg for arg in args if arg[0])
    return next(true_vals)[1]

name = first_true((a and b and c, 'first'),
                  (a and b and not c, 'second'),
                  (a and not b and c, 'third'),
                  (a and not b and not c, 'fourth'),
                  (not a and b and c, 'fifth'),
                  (not a and b and not c, 'sixth'),
                  (not a and not b and c, 'seventh'),
                  (not a and not b and not c, 'eighth'))

This method assumes that one of the tests passed in will be true. It could also be made lazier with lambdas.

share|improve this answer
    
My apologies, late night, no excuse but still. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 2 '12 at 0:14

To measure speeds:

from time import clock
a,b,c = True,False,False

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H = [],[],[],[],[],[],[],[]


for j in xrange(30):


    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = (a and b and c and 'first' or
                a and b and not c and 'second' or
                a and not b and c and 'third' or
                a and not b and not c and 'fourth' or
                not a and b and c and 'fifth' or
                not a and b and not c and 'sixth' or
                not a and not b and c and 'seventh' or
                not a and not b and not c and 'eighth')
    A.append(clock()-te)



    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        if a and b and c:
            name = 'first'
        elif a and b and not c:
            name = 'second'
        elif a and not b and c:
            name = 'third'
        elif a and not b and not c:
            name = 'fourth'
        elif not a and b and c:
            name = 'fifth'
        elif not a and b and not c:
            name = 'sixth'
        elif not a and not b and c:
            name = 'seventh'
        elif not a and not b and not c:
            name = 'eighth'
    B.append(clock()-te)

    #=====================================================================================

    li = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = li[a*4 + b*2 + c]
    C.append(clock()-te)

    #=====================================================================================

    nth = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = nth[(a and 4 or 0) | (b and 2 or 0) | (c and 1 or 0)]
    D.append(clock()-te)


    nth = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = nth[(a and 4 or 0) + (b and 2 or 0) + (c and 1 or 0)]
    E.append(clock()-te)

    #=====================================================================================

    values = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = values[( 4 if a else 0 )| ( 2 if b else 0 ) | ( 1 if c else 0 )]
    F.append(clock()-te)


    values = ['eighth', 'seventh', 'sixth', 'fifth', 'fourth', 'third', 'second', 'first']
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = values[( 4 if a else 0 ) + ( 2 if b else 0 ) + ( 1 if c else 0 )]
    G.append(clock()-te)

    #=====================================================================================

    dic = {(True, True, True): "first",
           (True, True, False): "second",
           (True, False, True): "third",
           (True, False, False): "fourth",
           (False, True, True): "fifth",
           (False, True, False): "sixth",
           (False, False, True): "seventh",
           (False, False, False): "eighth"}
    te = clock()
    for i in xrange(10000):
        name = dic[a,b,c]
    H.append(clock()-te)




print min(A),'\n', min(B),'\n\n', min(C),'\n\n', min(D),'\n',min(E),'\n\n',min(F),'\n', min(G),'\n\n', min(H)

Result

0.0480533140385 
0.0450973517584 

0.0309056039245 

0.0295291720037 
0.0286550385594 

0.0280122194301 
0.0266760160858 

0.0249769174574
share|improve this answer
    
If the object creation happens as often as the query (such as: both once) and is included in the measure, then the second option (the ifs) is by far the fastest. –  Felix Dombek Jan 22 '11 at 1:26

I'd go for the list/bits solution of @OscarRyz, @Clint and @Sven, but here's another one:


S1 = frozenset(['first', 'second', 'third', 'fourth'])
S2 = frozenset(['first', 'second', 'fifth', 'sixth'])
S3 = frozenset(['first', 'third', 'fifth', 'seventh'])
last = 'eighth'
empty = frozenset([])

def value(a, b, c): for r in (a and S1 or empty) & (b and S2 or empty) & (c and S3 or empty): return r return last

share|improve this answer
    
did you actually test anything to say that dictionary is the least efficient? I have and on my machine tim's solution is much faster than either sven's or clint's. –  SilentGhost Jan 18 '11 at 18:05
    
No, it was just a mere estimation. I think you're right and tim's solution being faster. I probably had in mind the other "dictionary solution" when i wrote that. Thanks for pointing it out, I'll edit my answer. –  primroot Jan 18 '11 at 18:57

if your goal is to avoid writing a lot of "ands" and boolean expressions you can use prime number and only one conditions like this (example for 2 conditions)

 cond = (2**cond_1)*(3**cond_2)

so

cond == 1 #means cond_1 and cond_2 are False
cond == 2 #means cond_1 is True and con_2 is False
cond == 3 #means cond_1 is False and con_2 is True
cond == 6 #means con_1 and Con_2 are True

This hack can be used for 3 conditions using 3 primes and so on

Like this...

cond = (2**a)*(3**b)*(5**c)
name = {30:'first', 6: 'second', 10:'third', 2:'fourth',
        15:'fifth', 3:'sixth', 5:'seventh', 1:'eighth'}[cond]
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