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I am going through this WPF tutorial http://blogs.vertigo.com/personal/alanl/Blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=18 and I have a question about the CountToFontSizeConverter section of the tutorial. Could someone please explain the return statement to me i.e

return ((minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize) ? 
         (minFontSize + count + increment) : maxFontSize;

I understand it's a conditional but the syntax looks rather bespoke. If possible could someone re-write this in a simpler way? Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not sure what you mean by "somewhat bespoke" but it's worth breaking down.

Original:

return ((minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize) 
      ? (minFontSize + count + increment) : maxFontSize;

Broken down:

bool condition = (minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize;
if (condition)
{
    return minFontSize + count + increment;
}
else
{
    return maxFontSize;
}

Better approach - far more readable:

return Math.Min(minFontSize + count + increment, maxFontSize);

In general, you can usually replace an expression of the form

a < b ? a : b

with

Math.Min(a, b)

assuming that a and b are of numeric types. It's not always the case, but it's a good starting point.

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Bespoke, according to Wikipedia is supposedly a British English word for "Tailor made down to the fabric and exact cuts" although given that you live there... –  Christopher Pfohl Jan 18 '11 at 17:23
    
@Cpfohl: Yes, I'm happy with "bespoke" as a word in general - but I don't see where it fits in here :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 18 '11 at 17:50
    
Perhaps 'bespoke' was the wrong word. Maybe I should have said 'unusual' as I am still learning C# and this syntax is unfamiliar to me :) –  Ben Jan 18 '11 at 18:02

This:

return ((minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize) ? (minFontSize + count + increment) : maxFontSize;

Effectively translates to:

if ((minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize)
     return (minFontSize + count + increment);
else
     return maxFontSize;

In this case, since the goal is to prevent the expression from being larger than "maxFontSize", I'd personally just use:

return Math.Min(minFontSize + count + increment, maxFontSize);

I find this expresses the intent much more clearly.

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This is an example of the ternary conditional operator (or simply the conditional operator), and can be rewritten as:

if ((minFontSize + count + increment) < maxFontSize) 
{
  return minFontSize + count + increment;
}

return maxFontSize;
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var cache = (minFontSize + count + increment);

return (cache < maxFontSize) ? cache : maxFontSize;
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It's nothing but a conditional operator from C#. Syntax is like following Condition ? Statement1 (if true) : Statement2 (if false) If your condition returns true, Statement1 is run and if turns out be false, Statement2 is run.

In your case if (minFontSize + count + increment) > maxFontSize , maxFontSize is evaluated else (minFontSize + count + increment)

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