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Why we can do something like

        for(int i = 0; i < destination->imageSize; i=i+3)
        { 

            buffer[2] = destination->imageData[i];
            buffer[1] = destination->imageData[i+1];
            buffer[0] = destination->imageData[i+2];
            buffer+=3;
        }

but we can not do

                               char buffer[destination->imageSize];

And how to such thing?

Sorry - I am quite new to C++...

BTW: my point is to create a function that would return a char with an image. If I'd use mem copy how do I delete returned value?

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1  
using vector<char> instead ? –  Alexandre C. Jan 18 '11 at 17:40
    
What's the question? Why you can't allocate an array of a size determined at runtime? How to? Are you having issues with manual memory management? Which issues? Something else? –  delnan Jan 18 '11 at 17:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have to ask, why do you think they're at all related? If you couldn't index an array by runtime variable, it'd be pretty useless for there to even be arrays. Declaring a variable of a size governed by a runtime variable is entirely different and requires fundamental changes to the way the compiler manages automatic memory.

Which is why you can't do it in C++. This may change, but for now you can't.

If you really need a variable sized array you need to allocate one dynamically. You can do it the hard, f'd up way (char * buff = new char[size]...delete [] buff;), or you can do it the easy, safer way (std::vector<char> buff(size)). Your choice. You can't build it "on the stack" though.

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"You can't build it "on the stack" though." -- you can, but alloca() isn't a standard function, though it's present on virtually every platform. –  Gene Bushuyev Jan 18 '11 at 18:33
  1. You cannot return a local array. Everything you return will need to be free'd by someone.

  2. The size of a local array must be constant. Always. This is because there is no special logic around arrays in C++. You can use some object collection of STL.

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char buffer[destination->imageSize]; declares a variable at compile time. At that time, the value of destination->imageSize is not yet known, which is why it doesn't work.

The expression buffer[2] = destination->imageData[i]; (or rather the buffer[2] thereof) is evaluated at run time.

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Hmm. Did you try creating a pointer or reference to destination->imageSize and passing that in for the index instead?

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Using std::vector you can achieve what you desire. Your function can be defined something like this:

void readImage(std::vector<char>& imageData, std::string& filename)
{
    size_t imageSize = 0;
    //read file and load imageSize
    imageData.resize(imageSize);
    // load image into imageData using such as you in your question
    for(int i = 0; i < destination->imageSize; i=i+3)
    { 

        buffer[2] = destination->imageData[i];
        buffer[1] = destination->imageData[i+1];
        buffer[0] = destination->imageData[i+2];
        buffer+=3;
    }
}

For further improvements you could return a bool that indicates success or failure.

Regarding the cause of C2466, I don't have the official answer but you can declare char arrays with const variables only like so:

const int imageSize = 4242; 
char imageData[imageSize]; // No C2466 error
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... but const int iom = destination->imageSize; char buffer[iom]; still is C2466 –  Rella Jan 18 '11 at 17:59
    
@Kabumbus Yes because as Noah Roberts indicates the value of iom is dependent on a runtime rvalue. –  Michael Smith Jan 18 '11 at 18:04

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