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$(t).html()

returns

<td>test1</td><td>test2</td>

I want to retrieve the second td from the $(t) object. I searched for the solution but nothing worked for me. Any idea how to get the second element.

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5 Answers

up vote 103 down vote accepted

grab the second child:

$(t).children().eq(1);

or, grab the second child <td>:

$(t).children('td').eq(1);
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thank you, helped me too –  DextrousDave Mar 27 '13 at 9:11
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Here's a solution that maybe is clearer to read in code:

To get the 2nd child of an unordered list:

   $('ul:first-child').next()

And a more elaborated example: This code gets the text of the 'title' attribute of the 2nd child element of the UL identified as 'my_list':

   $('ul#my_list:first-child').next().attr("title")

In this second example, you can get rid of the 'ul' at the start of the selector, as it's redundant, because an ID should be unique to a single page. It's there just to add clarity to the example.

Note on Performance and Memory, these two examples are good performants, because they don't make jquery save a list of ul elements that had to be filtered afterwards.

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While we care about performance, let's go ahead and keep a reference to the ul so that we won't have to search for it. –  daniel1426 Feb 26 at 1:27
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Try this:

$("td:eq(1)", $(t))

or

$("td", $(t)).eq(1)
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In addition to using jQuery methods, you can use the native cells collection that the <tr> gives you.

$(t)[0].cells[1].innerHTML

Assuming t is a DOM element, you could bypass the jQuery object creation.

t.cells[1].innerHTML

EDIT: Forgot to delete the [0] from the second example. Fixed.

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How's this:

$(t).first().next()

MAJOR UPDATE:

Apart from how beautiful the answer looks, you must also give a thought to the performance of the code. Therefore, it is also relavant to know what exactly is in the $(t) variable. Is it an array of <TD> or is it a <TR> node with several <TD>s inside it? To further illustrate the point, see the jsPerf scores on a <ul> list with 50 <li> children:

http://jsperf.com/second-child-selector

The $(t).first().next() method is the fastest here, by far.

But, on the other hand, if you take the <tr> node and find the <td> children and and run the same test, the results won't be the same.

Hope it helps. :)

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