Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm checking a variable, say foo, for equality to a number of values. For example,

if( foo == 1 || foo == 3 || foo == 12 ) {
    // ...
}

The point is that it is rather much code for such a trivial task. I came up with the following:

if( foo in {1: 1, 3: 1, 12: 1} ) {
    // ...
}

but also this does not completely appeal to me, because I have to give redundant values to the items in the object.

Does anyone know a decent way of doing an equality check against multiple values?

share|improve this question
    
I think the larger context needs to be involved when deciding something like this, because it's important to know why you're making such comparisons. –  Pointy Jan 18 '11 at 19:30
    
Well, in a game I'm creating I'm checking keyboard codes so as to decide what function should be called. In different browsers, a key has different key codes appearently, hence the need to compare with multiple values. –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 19:32

6 Answers 6

You could use an array and indexOf:

if ([1,3,12].indexOf(foo) > -1)
share|improve this answer
1  
I like this one. It would even be possible to create a 'contains' function through prototype I guess, so as to eliminate the use of > -1. –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 19:30
1  
@pimvdb: Note that you might need your own implementation as indexOf is only available since ECMAScript 5th edition. –  Gumbo Jan 18 '11 at 19:34
    
In another answer this is mentioned as well indeed, I didn't know that, thanks –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 19:36
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Using the answers provided, I ended up with the following:

Object.prototype.in = function() {
    for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++)
       if(arguments[i] == this) return true;
    return false;
}

It can be called like:

if(foo.in(1, 3, 12)) {
    // ...
}

Edit: I came across this 'trick' lately which is useful if the values are strings and do not contain special characters. For special characters is becomes ugly due to escaping and is also more error-prone due to that.

/foo|bar|something/.test(str);

To be more precise, this will check the exact string, but then again is more complicated for a simple equality test:

/^(foo|bar|something)$/.test(str);
share|improve this answer
    
Goodness! I'm astounded that works — in is a keyword in Javascript. For example, running function in() {}; in() results in a syntax error, at least in Firefox, and I'm not sure why your code doesn't. :-) –  Ben Blank Feb 4 '11 at 18:35
1  
Also, it's often considered bad practice to extend Object.prototype, as it affects for (foo in bar) in unfortunate ways. Perhaps change it to function contains(obj) { for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) if (arguments[i] === obj) return true; return false; } and pass the the object as an argument? –  Ben Blank Feb 4 '11 at 18:38
    
Thanks for your reaction, and the Google Closure Compiler also returns an error whilst compiling while this code itself works beatifully. Anyway, it has been suggested that a helper class can do this job better than extending Object.prototype as you also mention. However, I do prefer this way, as the notation for checking is lovely, just foo.in(1, 2, "test", Infinity), easy as pie. –  pimvdb Feb 4 '11 at 19:44
    
And defining a function in() the regular way fails on Chrome too, but prototype works... :) –  pimvdb Feb 4 '11 at 19:45

You can write if(foo in L(10,20,30)) if you define L to be

var L = function()
{
    var obj = {};
    for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++)
        obj[arguments[i]] = null;

    return obj;
};
share|improve this answer
    
That's even clearer than the former answers actually, thanks! –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 20:25
1  
I think it is prudent to remark that prototype functions are also 'in' an array/object - so if there is a function 'remove' in an array/object's prototype, it will always return true if you code 'remove' in L(1, 3, 12), although you didn't specify 'remove' to be put in the list. –  pimvdb Jan 20 '11 at 10:19
var a = [1,2,3];

if ( a.indexOf( 1 ) !== -1 ) { }

Note that indexOf is not in the core ECMAScript. You'll need to have a snippet for IE and possibly other browsers that dont support Array.prototype.indexOf.

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex */)
  {
    "use strict";

    if (this === void 0 || this === null)
      throw new TypeError();

    var t = Object(this);
    var len = t.length >>> 0;
    if (len === 0)
      return -1;

    var n = 0;
    if (arguments.length > 0)
    {
      n = Number(arguments[1]);
      if (n !== n)
        n = 0;
      else if (n !== 0 && n !== (1 / 0) && n !== -(1 / 0))
        n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
    }

    if (n >= len)
      return -1;

    var k = n >= 0
          ? n
          : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);

    for (; k < len; k++)
    {
      if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement)
        return k;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know IE didn't support indexOf, thanks for that –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 19:34
    
It is Mozilla's copy directly. Was too lazy to link. developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  meder Jan 18 '11 at 19:57
    
It is part of ECMAScript 5. –  Gumbo Jan 18 '11 at 20:14

This is easily extendable and readable:

switch (foo) {
    case 1:
    case 3:
    case 12:
        // ...
        break

    case 4:
    case 5:
    case 6:
        // something else
        break
}

But not necessarily easier :)

share|improve this answer
    
Not my favourite I'm afraid, but I hadn't thought of this. Thanks –  pimvdb Jan 18 '11 at 19:33

I liked the accepted answer, but thought it would be neat to enable it to take arrays as well, so I expanded it to this:

Object.prototype.isin = function() {
    for(var i = arguments.length; i--;) {
        var a = arguments[i];
        if(a.constructor === Array) {
            for(var j = a.length; j--;)
                if(a[j] == this) return true;
        }
        else if(a == this) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

var lucky = 7,
    more = [7, 11, 42];
lucky.isin(2, 3, 5, 8, more) //true

You can remove type coercion by changing == to ===.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.