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I have the following code example to use an object that receives the action from the callback. Doesn't seem like this is a good design pattern. Or is it?

When setTimeOut() fires on the function after 1 second, it uses the objInstance global variable (DOM scope) to access the ClassExample object instance. Can someone recommend a better way to utilize callbacks within an object oriented design?

The whole idea is so I can use the callback to update data within my object instance (increment a variable for example).

function ClassExample{
    this.initiate = function() {
        setTimeOut(objInstance.afterTimeOut,1000); //using the objects global handle
    }

    this.afterTimeOut = function() {
        alert("Received!");
    }

}

var objInstance = new ClassExample(); //instance
objInstance.initiate();
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2  
Wait, wat? That looks an aweful lot like over-OOPing it (as commonly found in e.g. Java). Why not setTimeOut(function() { ... }, n) (perhaps creating the function seperately just beforehand and giving it a descriptive name). Don't be afraid of that teensy glimpse of functional programming you would be using then. –  delnan Jan 18 '11 at 19:41
    
I like the term "over-OOP" because it describes lots of Javascript I wrote back when I didn't understand how profoundly different it is from Java :-) –  Pointy Jan 18 '11 at 19:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, you're not. You'll want to do this:

this.initiate = function() {
    setTimeOut(objInstance.afterTimeOut,1000); //using the objects global handle
}

Now, if "afterTimeout" needs the proper object context, you could do this:

this.initiate = function() {
  var instance = this;
  setTimeout(function() { instance.afterTimeOut(); }, 1000);
}

OK well you changed the question considerably with that little edit :-) If I were you, I'd just do this (like my original second example):

this.initiate = function() {
  var instance = this;
  setTimeout(function() { instance.afterTimeOut(); }, 1000);
}

Then you don't need any ugly global variables around at all.

edit — Stackoverflow user @Christoph comments that this isn't particularly pretty. One thing that might help would be to use a "bind" facility, as provided by newer browsers natively (as a method on the Function prototype) or by some libraries (Prototype or Functional for example). What "bind" lets you do is create a little wrapper function like I've got above:

this.initiate = function() {
  setTimeout(this.afterTimeOut.bind(this), 1000);
}

That call to "bind" returns a function that is effectively the same sort of thing as the little wrapper I coded explicitly in the example.

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Sorry about that edit, it was my typo. Thank you for spotting. –  Ryan Jan 18 '11 at 19:43
    
+1 this is the way to do it, disregard my answer, but do consider my opening statement :) –  Martin Jespersen Jan 18 '11 at 19:45
1  
Did you mean to say "instance.afterTimeOut()"? –  Ryan Jan 18 '11 at 19:46
    
@Ryan yes I did, thanks!!! –  Pointy Jan 18 '11 at 19:49
1  
Uhh ... well the "instance" variable will refer to whatever this was set to when "initiate" was called. If you call "objInstance.initiate()", then this will be that instance, and so that's what will be used to call "afterTimeOut" later. It's definitely not a copy of "objInstance". –  Pointy Jan 18 '11 at 19:53
function ClassExample{
    this.afterTimeOut = function() {
        alert("Received!");
    }; // Don't forget these

    setTimeOut(afterTimeOut, 1000); // Don't use () if you're passing the function as an argument
}

var objInstance = new ClassExample(); //instance

That way you don't need the initiate() method.


If you really want the initiate() method, I'd do it like this:

function ClassExample{
    var self = this;

    self.afterTimeOut = function() {
        alert("Received!");
    };

    self.initiate = function() {
        setTimeOut(self.afterTimeOut, 1000);
    };

}

var objInstance = new ClassExample(); //instance
objInstance.initiate();
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This is how I'd do it to allow timer reuse and minimize the number of closures:

function Timer(timeout, callback) {
    this.timeout = timeout;
    this.callback = callback;
}

Timer.prototype.run = function(thisArg /*, args... */) {
    var argArray = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    var timer = this;

    setTimeout(function() {
        timer.callback.apply(thisArg, argArray);
    }, timer.timeout);
};

var timer = new Timer(1000, alert);
timer.run(null, 'timer fired!');

And just for fun, a golfed version which is functionally equivalent, but replaces the object with a closure:

function delay(func, timeout) {
    return function() {
        var self = this, args = arguments;
        setTimeout(function() { func.apply(self, args); }, timeout);
    };
}

delay(alert, 1000).call(null, 'timer fired!');
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Not sure I really see the benefit over the simpler self = this example. Could you explain? Thanks! –  Ryan Jan 18 '11 at 20:50
1  
@Ryan: it works the same way (only self is called timer); however, you asked for 'good design', which means more than just making it work; some of my considerations: reusability (thus a general-purpose Timer class), readability (sane naming), efficency (pulling the methods out of the constructor means only a single function object has to be created instead of one per instance) and consistency (the signature of run() for Timer objects is the same as call() for Function objects) –  Christoph Jan 18 '11 at 21:21

You are right it is not the optimal way of doing what you are aiming for. however i have to wonder why you need to break the callstack as part of the initiation, it seems very academic.

apart from that if i had to do that, i'd probably use a closure like so:

function ClassExample{
    this.initiate = function() {
        setTimeOut((function(self) { return function() { self.afterTimeout();}})(this),1000); //using the objects global handle
    }

    this.afterTimeOut = function() {
        alert("Received!");
    }

}

var objInstance = new ClassExample(); //instance
objInstance.initiate()
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this.initiate = function() {
    var instance = this;
    setTimeOut(function() {
        instance.afterTimeOut();
    }, 1000);
};

By saving this to a local variable, you can avoid using the global handle at all. Also this prevent the afterTimeout() from losing it's this.

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