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func identityMat4() [16]float {
    return {
        1, 0, 0, 0,
        0, 1, 0, 0,
        0, 0, 1, 0,
        0, 0, 0, 1 }
}

I hope you get the idea of what I'm trying todo from the example. How do I do this is Go?

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Why is your matrix a one-dimensional array? Go supports multi-dimensional arrays / slices - wouldn't these be a better fit for the problem? (golang.org/ref/spec#Array_types) –  Rick-777 Dec 9 '12 at 15:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
func identityMat4() [16]float64 {
    return [...]float64{
        1, 0, 0, 0,
        0, 1, 0, 0,
        0, 0, 1, 0,
        0, 0, 0, 1 }
}

(Click to play)

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You are not returning an identity matrix. –  peterSO Jan 18 '11 at 23:44
    
^ fixed for readability and accuracy –  Seth Hoenig Jan 18 '11 at 23:55
s := []int{5, 2, 6, 3, 1, 4} // unsorted
sort.Ints(s)
fmt.Println(s)
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If you were writing your program using Go idioms, you would be using slices. For example,

package main

import "fmt"

func Identity(n int) []float {
    m := make([]float, n*n)
    for i := 0; i < n; i++ {
        for j := 0; j < n; j++ {
            if i == j {
                m[i*n+j] = 1.0
            }
        }
    }
    return m
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Identity(4))
}

Output: [1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1]
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4  
See blog.golang.org/2011/01/go-slices-usage-and-internals.html for the difference between arrays and slices. –  Jeff Allen Jan 21 '11 at 13:02
1  
The official Go blog now specifically points out transformation matrices as one of the few good use cases for using arrays directly: "Arrays have their place — they are a good representation of a transformation matrix for instance — but their most common purpose in Go is to hold storage for a slice." –  tbone Dec 2 '13 at 7:46

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