Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why does the Fortran 90 Specification specify (5.2.8) that the TARGET keyword must be used to associate a POINTER to it? Why isn't every type a valid TARGET?

For example,

INTEGER, POINTER :: px
INTEGER, TARGET :: x
x = 5
px => x
is valid syntax but
INTEGER, POINTER :: px
INTEGER :: x
x = 5
px => x
is not valid.

Why must this be?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

An item that might be pointed to could be aliased to another item, and the compiler must allow for this. Items without the target attribute should not be aliased and the compiler can make assumptions based on this and therefore more produce efficient code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Pointers in fortran are different than pointers in c. In fortran 90 pointers were provided with few restriction like having a target. This was done to address speed issue and to keep pointer usage safe. Although one call make allocatable pointers which do not need to specify a target. Dig deeper and you will find them!!

share|improve this answer
add comment

For better compiler optimization. When your code runs on 1K-100K cores speed does matter.

Btw TARGET is not always used. For example in situations when the pointer is being used for allocating memory.

...
real, pointer :: p(:), x
...
allocate(p(15))
...
x => p(1:5)
...
nullify(x)
deallocate(p)
...
share|improve this answer
    
Depending on the compiler, you have to allocate(x(5)) in order for this to work. –  AlanSE Dec 18 '11 at 3:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.