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Is there a way through data annotations to require that a boolean property be set to true?

public class MyAwesomeObj{
    public bool ThisMustBeTrue{get;set;}
}
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What exactly is the use case of this? Couldn't you just let the property be read-only and return true all the time? –  Jan Thomä Jan 18 '11 at 23:29
    
It's pretty much to say... hey buddy you forgot to check the I agree... which should make the model invalid. –  Marty Trenouth Jan 18 '11 at 23:35
    
I think this is something you'd want to handle client-side. –  PsychoCoder Jan 19 '11 at 1:24
4  
@PsychoCoder: It should be handled on both sides... not just client side. I was just looking to see if it could be handled by adding a simple data annotation. –  Marty Trenouth Jan 19 '11 at 1:40
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9 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You could create your own validator:

public class IsTrueAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    #region Overrides of ValidationAttribute

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the specified value of the object is valid. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the specified value is valid; otherwise, false. 
    /// </returns>
    /// <param name="value">The value of the specified validation object on which the <see cref="T:System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ValidationAttribute"/> is declared.
    ///                 </param>
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value == null) return false;
        if (value.GetType() != typeof(bool)) throw new InvalidOperationException("can only be used on boolean properties.");

        return (bool) value == true;
    }

    #endregion
}
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I'd consider enhancing this with a client side implementation - rather than using the remote validation referred to in other answers, use the unobtrusive spelt out here: jacopretorius.net/2011/01/client-side-validation-in-mvc-3.html –  SamStephens Oct 10 '11 at 22:22
    
This is a good (and tested) quick solution for us. We can do without the client side validation in @dazbradbury's solution (also a good one) because we only need this on a lone checkbox on the past page of a survey. –  Seth May 30 '13 at 17:41
    
It's not working. –  Jitendra Pancholi Jan 30 at 10:46
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I would create a validator for both Server AND Client side. Using MVC and unobtrusive form validation, this can be achieved simply by doing the following:

Firstly, create a class in your project to perform the server side validation like so:

public class EnforceTrueAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value == null) return false;
        if (value.GetType() != typeof(bool)) throw new InvalidOperationException("can only be used on boolean properties.");
        return (bool)value == true;
    }

    public override string FormatErrorMessage(string name)
    {
        return "The " + name + " field must be checked in order to continue.";
    }

    public IEnumerable<ModelClientValidationRule> GetClientValidationRules(ModelMetadata metadata, ControllerContext context)
    {
        yield return new ModelClientValidationRule
        {
            ErrorMessage = String.IsNullOrEmpty(ErrorMessage) ? FormatErrorMessage(metadata.DisplayName) : ErrorMessage,
            ValidationType = "enforcetrue"
        };
    }
}

Following this, annotate the appropriate property in your model:

[EnforceTrue(ErrorMessage=@"Error Message")]
public bool ThisMustBeTrue{ get; set; }

And Finally, enable client side validation by adding the following script to your View:

<script type="text/javascript">
    jQuery.validator.addMethod("enforcetrue", function (value, element, param) {
        return element.checked;
    });
    jQuery.validator.unobtrusive.adapters.addBool("enforcetrue");
</script>

Note: We already created a method GetClientValidationRules which pushes our annotation to the view from our model.

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Thanks for this - it works great! It works better with the override FormatErrorMessage method removed - that way localisation of error messages from Resource files works. My usage: [EnforceTrue(ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof(ValidationMessages), ErrorMessageResourceName = "TermsAndConditionsRequired")] –  Matt Frear Jan 17 at 12:19
    
I can't get the client side validation to work and can't seem to tell what I'm doing wrong. Where exactly should I put the javacsript? In the head tag? Next to the controller? –  vsdev Jan 30 at 10:09
    
Awesome. This should be mark as answer. –  Jitendra Pancholi Jan 30 at 10:45
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I know this is an older post but wanted to share a simple server side way to do this. You create a private property set to true and compare your bool to that property. If your bool is not checked (by default false) the form will not validate.

private bool isTrue
{ get { return true; } }

[Required]
[Display(Name = "I agree to the terms and conditions")]
[Compare("isTrue", ErrorMessage = "Please agree to Terms and Conditions")]
public bool iAgree { get; set; }
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You could either create your own attribute or use the CustomValidationAttribute.

This is how you would use the CustomValidationAttribute:

[CustomValidation(typeof(BoolValidation), "ValidateBool")]

where BoolValidation is defined as:

public class BoolValidation
{
  public static ValidationResult ValidateBool(bool boolToBeTrue)
  {
    if (boolToBeTrue)
    {
      return ValidationResult.Success;
    }
    else
    {
      return new ValidationResult(
          "Bool must be true.");
    }
  }
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[Required] attribute stands for requiring any value - it can be either true or false. You'd have to use another validation for that.

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Do you have the appropriate items set up in the web.config?

That could cause the validation not to work.

You can also try to create a custom validation attribute (since [Required] only cares whether or not it exists, and you care about the value):

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property | AttributeTargets.Field, AllowMultiple = false)]
sealed public class RequiredTrueAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    // Internal field to hold the mask value.
    readonly bool accepted;

    public bool Accepted
    {
        get { return accepted; }
    }

    public RequiredTrueAttribute(bool accepted)
    {
        this.accepted = accepted;
    }

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        bool isAccepted = (bool)value;
        return (isAccepted == true);
    }

    public override string FormatErrorMessage(string name)
    {
        return String.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture,
          ErrorMessageString, name, this.Accepted);
    }
}

Then, usage:

[RequiredTrue(ErrorMessage="{0} requires acceptance to continue.")]
public bool Agreement {get; set;}

From here.

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I don't know of a way through DataAnnotations, but this is easily done in your controller.

public ActionResult Add(Domain.Something model)
{

    if (!model.MyCheckBox)
        ModelState.AddModelError("MyCheckBox", "You forgot to click accept");

    if (ModelState.IsValid) {
        //'# do your stuff
    }

}

The only other option would be to build a custom validator for the server side and a remote validator for the client side (remote validation is only available in MVC3+)

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Kinda already new how to check the boolean flag already.... wanted to know if there was a dataannotation for it. –  Marty Trenouth Jan 18 '11 at 23:49
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I think the best way to handle this is just check in your controller if the box is true otherwise just add an error to your model and have it redisplay your view.

As previously stated all [Required] does is make sure there is a value and in your case if not checked you still get false.

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Just check to see whether its string representation is equal to True:

[RegularExpression("True")]
public bool TermsAndConditions { get; set; }
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This won't work for server-side validation, though, will it? –  Jerad Rose Jan 17 at 4:23
    
@JeradRose It's validated just fine on the server. Are you referring to client-side validation? –  ta.speot.is Jan 17 at 5:22
    
Confirmed, this works server side but not client side –  Matt Frear Jan 17 at 11:27
    
I thought the server side validation may have a type mismatch exception trying to compare a bool to a string. –  Jerad Rose Jan 17 at 13:04
    
RegularExpressionAttribute internally uses Convert.ToString to get the string representation of the property's value (which is delivered to it as an object). –  ta.speot.is Jan 17 at 13:34
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