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I'm trying to understand CSS positioning and I'm having trouble figuring out why a simple change that apparently should have no effect on the layout is causing a very disruptive change. I'm obviously missing something.

The initial objective was to place an inner div vertically and horizontally within another div. That was fairly simple:

html, body {
 margin:0;
 padding:0;
 height:100%;
}

div#container {
 position:relative;
 background:#4444ff;
 margin: 0 auto; /* center, not in IE5 */

 height:80%; 
 min-height:80%; 
}

div#childDiv {
 position:absolute;
 background:#ff5555;

 /* next we center it vertically and horizontally */
 width:900px;
 height:600px;
 top:50%;
 margin-top:-300px;
 left:50%;
 margin-left:-450px;
}

...and in the HTML page I used:

<body>
<div id=container>
 <div id=childDiv>
  test
    </div>
</div>


</body>

which worked fine.

The curious part is what happens when I change the position attribute of the #childDiv div from absolute to relative.

My understanding is that first is should not affect the #container div at all since I'm changing only the position of the child element, and second that it should not change the layout since it is the only child element, its parent uses relative position and third I have not specified any offsets (tp, left, etc).

Instead, when I make this change, the parent #container is messed up (shows only up to the half of the viewport instead of 80% height as previously), and the position of #childDiv changes accordingly (also upwards, half outside the viewport).

My questions is: why does that happen? What concepts I'm not taking into account and why was the parent div affected by a change in the children's position setting?

If I remove #childDiv from within #container and place it inside body, then #container is no longer affected by that change so it seems something is propagating up in the DOM, which is odd to me. I've seen the same in firefox, opera, IE and chrome.

I have read W3C's spec on this topic but I haven't been able to figure this one out so far...

UPDATE: I created examples in JS fiddle to show the problem. You can see the original is here: jsfiddle.net/7Pr9y/1 and the affected one is here: jsfiddle.net/7Pr9y/3

Thank you! Eduardo

share|improve this question
    
Could you post a demo in JS Fiddle, or JS Bin, that reproduces this behaviour? –  David Thomas Jan 19 '11 at 0:07
    
Sure. The original is here: jsfiddle.net/7Pr9y/1 and the affected one is here: jsfiddle.net/7Pr9y/3 - I have changed the div sizes to fit JS fiffle better but the problem remains the same. –  Edy Bourne Jan 19 '11 at 0:13
    
Have a look at this: alistapart.com/articles/css-positioning-101 –  Moshe Jan 19 '11 at 0:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When something is absolutely positioned, it is taken out of normal flow so its size, margins, etc. do not affect the things around it.

When something is relatively positioned, it is placed in normal flow (so its size, margins, etc. do affect the things around it) and layout is initially handled as if it were position: static, then it is moved according to the left, right, top and bottom properties.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I understand. What I don't get is why changing is why the parent moved upwards when I changed the child div's position to relative. I thought only the child would be affected since I have not changed any overflow settings for the parent. –  Edy Bourne Jan 19 '11 at 0:15
    
Although you have not shown exactly why the container div's height have changed, your post lead me to the solution so I'm marking it as accepted. See my own post below for the exact cause of this problem. Thank you!!! –  Edy Bourne Jan 19 '11 at 0:48

It looks like your CSS got complex quickly because as soon as you positioned the child div absolutely, your container div would have disappeared, and putting percentage-based widths and heights on it wouldn't work.

The reason for this is that once you position something absolutely, it's taken out of the document flow, so your container div is now acting as if it contains nothing. If it contains nothing, unless you give it absolute dimensions (say, in pixels), you're saying "size yourself to a certain percentage of your container", which in this case, is the body element, which also acts as if it contains nothing.

When you start tossing heights and widths and min-heights on every element to compensate, especially when they are relative values, the results can become unpredictable very quickly. My advice would be to check out this reference on the box model by Chris Coyier: http://css-tricks.com/the-css-box-model/

It's super straightforward and uses some great diagrams to help visualize the different aspects of CSS positioning.

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OK, I figured out why it becomes smaller when I change the size to relative.

Happens that because I have set the margins of the #childDiv to a negative value in order to center it, when I change it to relative that negative margin is taken into account when calculating the height of #container, resulting in a smaller #container.

I'm obviously a beginner in this, but seriously, it looks like CSS made it as complicated as possible to lay things out. No surprise most folks coming from table layouts start frustrated. :(

share|improve this answer

You don't need all these negative margin settings. Do the following:

    html, body {
      margin:0;
      padding:0;
      height:100%;
    }

    div#container {
      background:#4444ff;
      margin: 0 auto; /* center, not in IE5 */
      text-align: center;
      height:80%; 
      min-height:80%; 
    }

    div#container:before {
      content: '';
      display: inline-block;
      height: 100%;
      vertical-align: middle;
      margin-right: -0.25em; /* Adjusts for spacing */
    }

    div#childDiv {
     display: inline-block;
     text-align: left;
     vertical-align: middle;
     background:#ff5555;
     width:500px;
     height:200px;
    }

I have used your code you provided and changed it around a little, to make the ghost spacer (the div#container:before) work.

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