Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a bit of code that does some functional exception handling and everything works well, exceptions are raised when I want them to be, but when I'm debugging, the line-traces don't always do quite what I want them to.

Example A:

>>> 3/0
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

Example B:

>>> try: 3/0
... except Exception as e: raise e
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

In both of these examples, the exception really occurs in line 1, where we attempt to do 3/0, but in the latter example, we are told it has occurred on line 2, where it is raised.

Is there a way in Python to raise an exception, as if it were another exception, something that would produce the following output:

>>> try: 3/0
... except Exception as e: metaraise(e)
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

When you re-raise an exception that you caught, such as

except Exception as e: raise e

it resets the stack trace. It's just like re-raising a new exception. What you want is this:

except Exception as e: raise
share|improve this answer
1  
And you don't need to store in in a variable in this case. –  Sven Marnach Jan 19 '11 at 0:05
    
Except that I need to be storing it in a variable somehow and passing it around to somewhere it will eventually be raised. –  Kevin Dolan Jan 19 '11 at 0:29
1  
@Kevin Dolan: and this is making your code easier to understand and more debuggable, or is it an entry in an obfuscation contest? –  John Machin Jan 24 '11 at 20:30
    
It's actually for a decorator abstraction that allows exception swallowing/modification. –  Kevin Dolan Jan 25 '11 at 0:00
add comment
up vote 2 down vote accepted

For reference, the solution is approximately as follows:

def getException():
    return sys.exc_info()

def metaraise(exc_info):
    raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]

try: 3/0
except:
    e = getException()
    metaraise(e)

The beautiful part of this is that you can then pass around the variable e and metaraise it somewhere else, even if other exceptions have been encountered along the way.

share|improve this answer
    
But then you'll have no information about the trace of the new raise. Any catcher above will be fooled to believe that the exception was raised in the original spot only. The second raiser hides its existence which can be quite confusing in debugging cases. –  Alfe Sep 5 '12 at 9:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.