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I've been tinkering with small functions on my own time, trying to find ways to refactor them (I recently read Martin Fowler's book Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code). I found the following function MakeNiceString() while updating another part of the codebase near it, and it looked like a good candidate to mess with. As it is, there's no real reason to replace it, but it's small enough and does something small so it's easy to follow and yet still get a 'good' experience from.

private static string MakeNiceString(string str)
        {
            char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
            string result = null;
            int i = 0;
            result += System.Convert.ToString(ca[0]);
            for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
                {
                    result += " ";
                }
                result += System.Convert.ToString(ca[i]);
            }
            return result;
        }


static string SplitCamelCase(string str)
    {
        string[] temp = Regex.Split(str, @"(?<!^)(?=[A-Z])");
        string result = String.Join(" ", temp);
        return result;
    }
The first function `MakeNiceString()` is the function I found in some code I was updating at work. The purpose of the function is to translate **ThisIsAString** to **This Is A String**. It's used in a half-dozen places in the code, and is pretty insignificant in the whole scheme of things. I built the second function purely as an academic exercise to see if using a regular expression would take longer or not. Well, here are the results: With 10 Iterations:
MakeNiceString took 2649 ticks
SplitCamelCase took 2502 ticks

However, it changes drastically over the longhaul:

With 10,000 Iterations:

MakeNiceString took 121625 ticks
SplitCamelCase took 443001 ticks


Refactoring MakeNiceString()

The process of refactoring MakeNiceString() started with simply removing the conversions that were taking place. Doing that yielded the following results:

MakeNiceString took 124716 ticks
ImprovedMakeNiceString took 118486

Here's the code after Refactor #1:

private static string ImprovedMakeNiceString(string str)
        { //Removed Convert.ToString()
            char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
            string result = null;
            int i = 0;
            result += ca[0];
            for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
                {
                    result += " ";
                }
                result += ca[i];
            }
            return result;
        }

Refactor#2 - Use StringBuilder

My second task was to use StringBuilder instead of String. Since String is immutable, unnecessary copies were being created throughout the loop. The benchmark for using that is below, as is the code:

static string RefactoredMakeNiceString(string str)
        {
            char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder((str.Length * 5 / 4));
            int i = 0;
            sb.Append(ca[0]);
            for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
                {
                    sb.Append(" ");
                }
                sb.Append(ca[i]);
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }
This results in the following Benchmark:
MakeNiceString Took:           124497 Ticks   //Original
SplitCamelCase Took:           464459 Ticks   //Regex
ImprovedMakeNiceString Took:   117369 Ticks   //Remove Conversion
RefactoredMakeNiceString Took:  38542 Ticks   //Using StringBuilder

Changing the for loop to a foreach loop resulted in the following benchmark result:

static string RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString(string str)
        {
            char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
            StringBuilder sb1 = new StringBuilder((str.Length * 5 / 4));
            sb1.Append(ca[0]);
            foreach (char c in ca)
            {
                if (!(char.IsLower(c)))
                {
                    sb1.Append(" ");
                }
                sb1.Append(c);
            }
            return sb1.ToString();
        }
RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString    Took:  45163 Ticks

As you can see, maintenance-wise, the foreach loop will be the easiest to maintain and have the 'cleanest' look. It is slightly slower than the for loop, but infinitely easier to follow.

Alternate Refactor: Use Compiled Regex

I moved the Regex to right before the loop is begun, in hopes that since it only compiles it once, it'll execute faster. What I found out (and I'm sure I have a bug somewhere) is that that doesn't happen like it ought to:

static void runTest5()
        {
            Regex rg = new Regex(@"(?<!^)(?=[A-Z])", RegexOptions.Compiled);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                CompiledRegex(rg, myString);
            }
        }
 static string CompiledRegex(Regex regex, string str)
    {
        string result = null;
        Regex rg1 = regex;
        string[] temp = rg1.Split(str);
        result = String.Join(" ", temp);
        return result;
    }

Final Benchmark Results:

MakeNiceString Took                   139363 Ticks
SplitCamelCase Took                   489174 Ticks
ImprovedMakeNiceString Took           115478 Ticks
RefactoredMakeNiceString Took          38819 Ticks
RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString Took   44700 Ticks
CompiledRegex Took                    227021 Ticks

Or, if you prefer milliseconds:

MakeNiceString Took                  38 ms
SplitCamelCase Took                 123 ms
ImprovedMakeNiceString Took          33 ms
RefactoredMakeNiceString Took        11 ms
RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString Took 12 ms
CompiledRegex Took                   63 ms

So the percentage gains are:

MakeNiceString                   38 ms   Baseline
SplitCamelCase                  123 ms   223% slower
ImprovedMakeNiceString           33 ms   13.15% faster
RefactoredMakeNiceString         11 ms   71.05% faster
RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString  12 ms   68.42% faster
CompiledRegex                    63 ms   65.79% slower

(Please check my math)

In the end, I'm going to replace what's there with the RefactoredForEachMakeNiceString() and while I'm at it, I'm going to rename it to something useful, like SplitStringOnUpperCase.

Benchmark Test:

To benchmark, I simply invoke a new Stopwatch for each method call:

       string myString = "ThisIsAUpperCaseString";
       Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
       sw.Start();
       runTest();
       sw.Stop();

     static void runTest()
        {

            for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                MakeNiceString(myString);
            }


        }


Questions

  • What causes these functions to be so different 'over the long haul', and
  • How can I improve this function a) to be more maintainable or b) to run faster?
  • How would I do memory benchmarks on these to see which used less memory?


Thank you for your responses thus far. I've inserted all of the suggestions made by @Jon Skeet, and would like feedback on the updated questions I've asked as a result.

NB: This question is meant to explore ways to refactor string handling functions in C#. I copied/pasted the first code as is. I'm well aware you can remove the System.Convert.ToString() in the first method, and I did just that. If anyone is aware of any implications of removing the System.Convert.ToString(), that would also be helpful to know.

share|improve this question
    
The regex versions are not equivalent to the original in funcationality, see my answer for explanation. –  toad Jan 23 '09 at 19:53
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/473087/… –  toad Jan 23 '09 at 19:54

10 Answers 10

up vote 17 down vote accepted

1) Use a StringBuilder, preferrably set with a reasonable initial capacity (e.g. string length * 5/4, to allow one extra space per four characters).

2) Try using a foreach loop instead of a for loop - it may well be simpler

3) You don't need to convert the string into a char array first - foreach will work over a string already, or use the indexer.

4) Don't do extra string conversions everywhere - calling Convert.ToString(char) and then appending that string is pointless; there's no need for the single character string

5) For the second option, just build the regex once, outside the method. Try it with RegexOptions.Compiled as well.

EDIT: Okay, full benchmark results. I've tried a few more things, and also executed the code with rather more iterations to get a more accurate result. This is only running on an Eee PC, so no doubt it'll run faster on "real" PCs, but I suspect the broad results are appropriate. First the code:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

class Benchmark
{
    const string TestData = "ThisIsAUpperCaseString";
    const string ValidResult = "This Is A Upper Case String";
    const int Iterations = 1000000;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test(BenchmarkOverhead);
        Test(MakeNiceString);
        Test(ImprovedMakeNiceString);
        Test(RefactoredMakeNiceString);
        Test(MakeNiceStringWithStringIndexer);
        Test(MakeNiceStringWithForeach);
        Test(MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndLinqSkip);
        Test(MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndCustomSkip);
        Test(SplitCamelCase);
        Test(SplitCamelCaseCachedRegex);
        Test(SplitCamelCaseCompiledRegex);        
    }

    static void Test(Func<string,string> function)
    {
        Console.Write("{0}... ", function.Method.Name);
        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i=0; i < Iterations; i++)
        {
            string result = function(TestData);
            if (result.Length != ValidResult.Length)
            {
                throw new Exception("Bad result: " + result);
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(" {0}ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        GC.Collect();
    }

    private static string BenchmarkOverhead(string str)
    {
        return ValidResult;
    }

    private static string MakeNiceString(string str)
    {
        char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
        string result = null;
        int i = 0;
        result += System.Convert.ToString(ca[0]);
        for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
            {
                result += " ";
            }
            result += System.Convert.ToString(ca[i]);
        }
        return result;
    }

    private static string ImprovedMakeNiceString(string str)
    { //Removed Convert.ToString()
        char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
        string result = null;
        int i = 0;
        result += ca[0];
        for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
            {
                result += " ";
            }
            result += ca[i];
        }
        return result;
    }

    private static string RefactoredMakeNiceString(string str)
    {
        char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder((str.Length * 5 / 4));
        int i = 0;
        sb.Append(ca[0]);
        for (i = 1; i <= ca.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if (!(char.IsLower(ca[i])))
            {
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            sb.Append(ca[i]);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static string MakeNiceStringWithStringIndexer(string str)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder((str.Length * 5 / 4));
        sb.Append(str[0]);
        for (int i = 1; i < str.Length; i++)
        {
            char c = str[i];
            if (!(char.IsLower(c)))
            {
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static string MakeNiceStringWithForeach(string str)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length * 5 / 4);
        bool first = true;      
        foreach (char c in str)
        {
            if (!first && char.IsUpper(c))
            {
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            sb.Append(c);
            first = false;
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static string MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndLinqSkip(string str)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length * 5 / 4);
        sb.Append(str[0]);
        foreach (char c in str.Skip(1))
        {
            if (char.IsUpper(c))
            {
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static string MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndCustomSkip(string str)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length * 5 / 4);
        sb.Append(str[0]);
        foreach (char c in new SkipEnumerable<char>(str, 1))
        {
            if (char.IsUpper(c))
            {
                sb.Append(" ");
            }
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static string SplitCamelCase(string str)
    {
        string[] temp = Regex.Split(str, @"(?<!^)(?=[A-Z])");
        string result = String.Join(" ", temp);
        return result;
    }

    private static readonly Regex CachedRegex = new Regex("(?<!^)(?=[A-Z])");    
    private static string SplitCamelCaseCachedRegex(string str)
    {
        string[] temp = CachedRegex.Split(str);
        string result = String.Join(" ", temp);
        return result;
    }

    private static readonly Regex CompiledRegex =
        new Regex("(?<!^)(?=[A-Z])", RegexOptions.Compiled);    
    private static string SplitCamelCaseCompiledRegex(string str)
    {
        string[] temp = CompiledRegex.Split(str);
        string result = String.Join(" ", temp);
        return result;
    }

    private class SkipEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
    {
        private readonly IEnumerable<T> original;
        private readonly int skip;

        public SkipEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> original, int skip)
        {
            this.original = original;
            this.skip = skip;
        }

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            IEnumerator<T> ret = original.GetEnumerator();
            for (int i=0; i < skip; i++)
            {
                ret.MoveNext();
            }
            return ret;
        }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }
    }
}

Now the results:

BenchmarkOverhead...  22ms
MakeNiceString...  10062ms
ImprovedMakeNiceString...  12367ms
RefactoredMakeNiceString...  3489ms
MakeNiceStringWithStringIndexer...  3115ms
MakeNiceStringWithForeach...  3292ms
MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndLinqSkip...  5702ms
MakeNiceStringWithForeachAndCustomSkip...  4490ms
SplitCamelCase...  68267ms
SplitCamelCaseCachedRegex...  52529ms
SplitCamelCaseCompiledRegex...  26806ms

As you can see, the string indexer version is the winner - it's also pretty simple code.

Hope this helps... and don't forget, there are bound to be other options I haven't thought of!

share|improve this answer
    
I will try just that. I was hoping you'd respond. Quick question: When I do that, should I update my question with benchmarks/results from the refactor? Or should I add it was an answer? I normally don't ask questions that I actually participate in like this. –  George Stocker Jan 23 '09 at 14:46
    
@Jon Skeet do you know of any resources that talk about complexity analysis of Regular Expressions? –  Jason Punyon Jan 23 '09 at 14:49
    
Aren't #1 and #2 slightly opposed? Using a SB with a set size improves perf, but I always thought foreach was pretty well known to be slower than a for loop since it has to use the iterator. foreach is often simpler, but if the goal is perf I'd continue to use indexing. –  ctacke Jan 23 '09 at 14:53
    
@Gortok: Update the question. @JPunyon: Nope, I'm afraid not. @ctacke: foreach can be slightly slower in some situations, but only with a constant multiplicative factor, e.g. "lose 10%" whereas with long strings StringBuilder will get much better. We've been asked for perf and maintenance. –  Jon Skeet Jan 23 '09 at 14:56
    
(Not that the string is likely to be hugely long in this case, I should say...) –  Jon Skeet Jan 23 '09 at 15:19

You might want to try instantiating a Regex object as a class member and using the RegexOptions.Compiled option when you create it.

Currently, you're using the static Split member of Regex, and that doesn't cache the regular expression. Using an instanced member object instead of the static method should improve your performance even more (over the long run).

share|improve this answer

Use a StringBuilder instead of concatenation. Each concatenation is creating a new string instance and throwing away the old.

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Try refactoring so that the regular expression that you're using to split the string in the second method is stored in a static method, and has been built using the RegexOptions.Compiled option. More info about this here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8zbs0h2f.aspx.

I didn't test the theory, but I'd imagine that having to recreate the regex every time would be time consuming.

share|improve this answer

This is in response to ctacke's comment on Jon Skeet's answer (It's not long for a comment)

I always thought foreach was pretty well known to be slower than a for loop since it has to use the iterator.

Actually, no, in this case foreach would be faster. Index access is bounds checked (ie. i is check to be in range three time in the loop: once in the for() and once each for the two ca[i]s), which makes a for loop slower than foreach.

If the C# compiler detects the specific syntax:

 for(i = 0; i < ca.Length; i++)

then it will perform a ad hoc optimization, removing the internal bound-checks, making the for() loop faster. However, since here we must treat ca[0] as a special case (to prevent a leading space on the output), we can't trigger that optimization.

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I know what they say about RegEx, use it to solve a problem and now you have two problems, but I remain a fan, Just for grins, here is a RegEx version. RegEx, with a little initiation is easy to read, less code, and lets you easily snap in additional delimiters (as I did with the comma).

   s1 = MakeNiceString( "LookOut,Momma,There'sAWhiteBoatComingUpTheRiver" ) );

   private string MakeNiceString( string input )
   {
       StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( input );
       int Incrementer = 0;
       MatchCollection mc;
       const string SPACE = " ";

       mc = Regex.Matches( input, "[A-Z|,]" );

       foreach ( Match m in mc )
       {
           if ( m.Index > 0 )
           {
               sb.Insert( m.Index + Incrementer, SPACE );
               Incrementer++;
           }
       }

       return sb.ToString().TrimEnd();
   }
share|improve this answer

My first refactoring would be to change the name of the method to something more descriptive. MakeNiceString imo is not a name that would indicate to me what this method does.

How about PascalCaseToSentence? Not loving that name, but it's better than MakeNiceString.

share|improve this answer
    
@steve_c: That's what I came into when I found this code. That's initially what attracted me to it, it didn't make sense to have a method named that. That's why we're here, incidentally, because I got curious with a piece of code that wasn't named properly. :-) –  George Stocker Jan 23 '09 at 16:50
    
No worries, Gortok. That just would have been step #1 for me with this refactoring. But ya, thanks to the useless name it caught your attention. –  steve_c Jan 23 '09 at 20:30

In C# (.Net, really) When you append a string there are several things going on in the background. Now, I forget the specifics, but it is something like:

string A = B + C;

A += D; A += E;

// ... rinse-repeat for 10,000 iterations

For each line above, .NET will: 1) Allocate some new memory for A. 2) Copy the string B into the new memory. 3) Extend the memory to hold C. 4) Append the string C to A.

The longer the string A, the more time this takes. Add to that, the more times you do this, the longer A gets, the exponentially longer this takes.

However, with StringBuilder you are not allocating new memory, thus you skip that problem.

If you say :

StringBuilder A = new StringBuilder();
A.Append(B);
A.Append(C);
// .. rinse/repeat for 10,000 times...

string sA = A.ToString();

StringBuilder (Edit: fixed description) has a string in memory. It doesn't need to re-allocate the entire string for each added sub-string. When you issue ToString(), the string is already appended in the proper format.

One shot instead of a loop that takes an increasingly longer period.

I hope that helps answer the WHY it took so much less time.

share|improve this answer
    
That explanation of StringBuilder's internals is entirely incorrect. It doesn't maintain a list of things to append together - it maintains a string which is the current value. This string has spare capacity, and memory is reallocated where necessary. –  Jon Skeet Jan 23 '09 at 17:14
    
Ah... my mistake. It doesn't do the re-allocation each time. That's what I was actually aiming at, but you are correct. –  Jerry Jan 23 '09 at 17:22

The Regex versions of your solution are not equivalent in results to the original code. Perhaps the larger context of the code avoids the areas where they differ. The original code will add a space for anything that is not a lower case character. For example "This\tIsATest" would become "This \t Is A Test" in the original but "This\t Is A Test" with the Regex versions.

(?<!^)(?=[^a-z])

Is the pattern you want for a closer match, but even then it is still ignoring issues of i18n. The following pattern should take care of that:

(?<!^)(?=\P{Ll})
share|improve this answer
    
The Regex was just included to have something to benchmark against. It was never a 'serious' contender to actually be used. When I started this refactoring, I knew that it'd come down to using String Builder, it was just a matter of refactoring to that point. –  George Stocker Jan 23 '09 at 20:12
    
I found it was an interesting illustration of how careful you need to be with refactoring even a small function. It is easy to overlook what the code is actually doing with what its perceived intention is. –  toad Jan 23 '09 at 21:22

Here is a slightly more optimal version. I have taken suggestions from previous posters, but also appended to the string builder in a block-wise fashion. This may allow string builder to copy 4 bytes at a time, depending on the size of the word. I have also removed the string allocation and just replace it by str.length.

    static string RefactoredMakeNiceString2(string str)
    {
        char[] ca = str.ToCharArray();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str.Length);
        int start = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < ca.Length; i++)
        {
            if (char.IsUpper(ca[i]) && i != 0)
            {
                sb.Append(ca, start, i - start);
                sb.Append(' ');
                start = i;
            }
        }
        sb.Append(ca, start, ca.Length - start);
        return sb.ToString();
    }
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