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I am working through the book "Accelerated C++" and one of the exercises require us to emulate the 'equal' function in the header and so far I have implemented the simple version which takes three parameters as follows:

template <class iterType1, class iterType2>
bool cequal(iterType1 begin, iterType1 end, iterType2 e){

    while(begin != end){
        if(!(*begin == *e))
            return false;
        ++begin;
        ++e;
    }
    return true;
}

and the second version which can accept a fourth parameter...

template <class iterType1, class iterType2, class boolPred>
bool cequal(iterType1 begin, iterType1 end, iterType2 e, boolPred pred){

    while(begin != end){
        if(!pred(*begin, *e))
            return false;
        ++begin;
        ++e;
    }
    return true;
}

My question is, is this the ideal way to do it? or are these two functions mergable?

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3 Answers 3

The first version can call the second version, passing an equal_to object as the last parameter. Or you can just set that as a default parameter. I take that back. I can't actually figure out a way to have a default argument for a function template. I can't even figure out how to re-use the code in the overload solution without using a c++0x feature(decltype).

template <class iterType1, class iterType2>
bool cequal(iterType1 begin, iterType1 end, iterType2 e){
    return cequal(begin, end, e, std::equal_to<decltype(*begin)>());
}
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1  
The problem with equal_to is that it expects the 2 operands to have the same type, whereas his function has 2 different types for its operands. –  Blindy Jan 19 '11 at 3:24
    
@Blindy: His function has different types for it's iterators, but that doesn't mean the types of elements wouldn't be the same. I think it's unlikely that you would want to compare two different types anyway, and this will raise an error if you try to. I don't really see that as a problem. If that is what he wants, he can of course use a different function. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 19 '11 at 16:18

Those two functions aren't just mergeable, they're almost exactly the same, line for line.

I could expand and do it all for you, but that would be a bit of a spoiler.

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If you want to merge them, you could provide a default predicate for the last parameter that only calls operator== on the inputs.

edit: an example would be:

template<typename T1, typename T2>
struct eqpred
{
  bool operator(T1 &a, T2 &b) { return a==b; }
}

template <class iterType1, class iterType2, class boolPred=eqpred>
bool cequal(iterType1 begin, iterType1 end, iterType2 e, boolPred pred){

    while(begin != end){
        if(!pred(*begin, *e))
            return false;
        ++begin;
        ++e;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about that but I don't know the syntax to set the default parameter to == operator –  Moin Jan 19 '11 at 2:25
    
@Moin, updated with an example. –  Blindy Jan 19 '11 at 3:08
    
Does this work? This will require you to explicitly pass a boolPred as the last argument, and IIRC you can't give default arguments in function templates. –  templatetypedef Jan 19 '11 at 3:10
    
@templatetypedef, love your name lol; I think it should work, although my C++ is rusty these days. –  Blindy Jan 19 '11 at 3:12

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