Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a sample js object literal which can be accessed in the following way:

hist.undo[0].operation[0].x // would print '2' or whatever
hist.undo[0].operation[0].y // would print '21' or whatever
// [...]
hist.undo[2].operation[0].x // would print '32' or whatever
hist.undo[2].operation[0].y // would print '12' or whatever

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
is this homework ? –  Mihai Toader Jan 19 '11 at 1:59
    
@Toader Mihai Claudiu - No. I am new to JSON and am having trouble creating objects. –  Rigil Jan 19 '11 at 2:01
    
This post might help you better understand JavaScript objects stackoverflow.com/questions/1704618/… –  Lance Jan 19 '11 at 2:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
test
<script>
hist = {
 "undo" : [
  {
   "operation": [ {"x":"2","y":"21"}, {"x":"x2","y":"y21"} ]
  },
  {
   "operation": [ {"x":"99","y":"88"} ]
  },
  {
   "operation": [ {"x":"32","y":"12"} ]
  }
 ]
 };
alert(hist.undo[0].operation[0].x);
alert(hist.undo[0].operation[0].y);
alert(hist.undo[2].operation[0].x);
alert(hist.undo[2].operation[0].y);
</script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Wont this only work if there is 1 undo? I need multiple undo objects that contain multiple operations. So basically, each hist object contains multiple undo objects. Each undo object contains multiple operation objects which themselves contain multiple operations. Thanks –  Rigil Jan 19 '11 at 2:16
    
You may be confused. From the index undo[2], it should be clear that there are 3 undo objects in there. Please have a look again. The notation ' "undo" : [ ' means that "undo" is an array, and in that array, you see 3 unnamed objects. –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 19 '11 at 2:32
    
Ah, my mistake. Thanks this does exactly what I need. –  Rigil Jan 19 '11 at 2:37

(working jsfiddle example here)

var sample_operation_member = {"x": 100, "y": 250};
var sample_undo_member = { "operation" : [sample_operation_member, sample_operation_member,sample_operation_member] };

var hist = {
   "undo": [
      sample_undo_member,
      sample_undo_member,
      sample_undo_member,
      sample_undo_member
   ]
}

alert(hist.undo[0].operation[0].x);

Or, more verbosely:

var hist = {
    undo: [
        {"operation": [{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100}]},
        {"operation": [{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100}]},
        {"operation": [{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100}]},
        {"operation": [{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100},{"x": 100, "y":100}]}
    ]
}

alert(hist.undo[0].operation[0].x);
share|improve this answer
1  
you might want to consider following the spec. json.org "A string is a sequence of zero or more Unicode characters, wrapped in double quotes, using backslash escapes" While most parsers work without the quotes, it is a good idea to include them –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 19 '11 at 2:40
    
good point, thanks –  Kyle Wild Jan 19 '11 at 8:18
    
just remembering ObjectLiteral != SJON should be the same, but not act always the same –  Vitim.us Dec 20 '11 at 4:39
    
Thanks again. I've updated my answer and the JSFiddle example to incorporate @Richardakacyberkiwi 's advice –  Kyle Wild Dec 22 '11 at 19:49
hist = { "undo" : [
      {"operation":[
        {"x":2,"y":21},
        {"x":3,"y":31}
      ]},
      {"operation":[
        {"x":4,"y":41},
        {"x":5,"y":51}
      ]},
      {"operation":[
        {"x":6,"y":61},
        {"x":7,"y":71}
      ]}
     ]
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.