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I have an XML file like this:

<content>
    <box>
        <var1>A1</var1>
        <var2>B1</var2>
        <var3>C1</var3>
        <var4>D1</var4>
    </box>
    <box>
        <var1>A2</var1>
        <var2>B2</var2>
        <var3>C2</var3>
        <var4>D2</var4>
    </box>
    <box>
        <var1>A3</var1>
        <var2>B3</var2>
        <var3>C3</var3>
        <var4>D3</var4>
    </box>
</content>

It has 500 box elements which I need to parse into JavaScript objects. I am using this code which works fine but I am a newbie and maybe I am missing something and would like to get suggestions if there is a better/faster way to do it:

var app = {
    //...
    box: [],

    init: function (file) {
        var that = this;

        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: file,
            dataType: "xml",
            success: function (xml) {
                $("box", xml).each(function (i) {
                    var e = $(this);
                    that.box[i] = new Box(i, {
                        var1: e.children("var1").text(),
                        var2: e.children("var2").text(),
                        var3: e.children("var3").text(),
                        var4: e.children("var4").text()
                    });
                });
            }
        });
    },
    //...
};

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use JSON if at all possible. That way the browser will do the parsing for you and you won't have to do any post-processing.

JSON from the server

{"content":
  {"box": [
    {"var1": "A1",
     "var2": "B1",
     "var3": "C1",
     "var4": "D1"},
    {"var1": "A2",
     "var2": "B2",
     "var3": "C2",
     "var4": "D2"},
    {"var1": "A3",
     "var2": "B3",
     "var3": "C3",
     "var4": "D3"}]}}

Client JavaScript

var app = {
    //...
    box: [],

    init: function (file) {
        var that = this;

        $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: file,
            dataType: "json",
            success: function(result) {
              that.box = $.map(result.content.box, function(box, i) {
                return new Box(i, box);
              });
            }
        });
    },
    //...
};
share|improve this answer
    
This looks great, but then how could I add methods to the prototype of the created box objects? –  VerizonW Jan 19 '11 at 2:52
    
You could use a for...in loop to copy all the properties from result.content.box into an object with the methods you want (you can do that in a 'constructor' type function if you like). It's not quite as elegant. Alternatively, you could assign all the methods to the JSON result object yourself inside the success function. –  Walter Mundt Jan 19 '11 at 4:09
    
In other words -- generally, you can't actually give the created box objects a special prototype. Instead, you have to translate the "plain old data" objects the JSON parser gives you into fully-functional versions yourself somehow, or just use them the way they come in more procedural-style code. –  Walter Mundt Jan 19 '11 at 4:17
    
Ah, I forgot about the Box instance thing. @Walter Mundt is right and I updated my answer to show how you might do it. –  Brian Donovan Jan 19 '11 at 17:47
    
This works great, I get the same result as with my previous method but now using JSON, I'll keep both methods and call this initJSON(). Now I have another related question but I think that should go in a new post, thanks! –  VerizonW Jan 20 '11 at 1:38
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I have an XML source I am forced to use.. I convert it to JSON on the client side and then load it.. much easier..

Tracker.loadCasesFromServer = function () {
$.ajax({
    type: 'GET',
    url: '/WAITING.CASES.XML',
    dataType: 'xml',
    success: function (data) {
            Tracker.cases = jQuery.parseJSON(xml2json(data, ""));
            Tracker.loadCasesToMap();
        },
        data: {},
        async: true
    });

};

Used the XML2JSON converter that can be found here: http://www.thomasfrank.se/xml_to_json.html

Duncan

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Thanks, but I think this means doing an extra step and there would be no performance gains because the xml2json function is probably doing something very similar to my method. Maybe parsing the XML into JSON on the server would be a better idea??? –  VerizonW Jan 20 '11 at 1:46
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You can use browser native XML support which I guess would be fast. However this is varied amongst browsers e.g.(Firefox : DOMParser, IE: XMLDOM ..).

So instead of just going on and manually handling all browsers, you could make use of something like this https://sites.google.com/a/van-steenbeek.net/archive/explorer_domparser_parsefromstring

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I'm already parsing the XML using jQuery which I think is way easier than the native JavaScript DOM methods and handles the browser differences. –  VerizonW Jan 20 '11 at 1:52
    
Well im not sure, but i think JQuery parse XML as regular HTML.. try inserting something like <plaintext></plaintext>, in regular XML this is perfectly ok, parse it with jquery it will think it is the deprecated HTML "plaintext", and your question is about performance, so using the native support is supposed to be faster!! but yet again u never know... You should benchmark for an accurate answer... Cheerz –  Amjad Masad Jan 20 '11 at 18:33
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