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I have a shell script I wish to read parameters from an external file, to get files via FTP:

parameters.txt:

FTP_SERVER=ftpserer.foo.org
FTP_USER_NAME=user
FTP_USER_PASSWORD=pass
FTP_SOURCE_DIRECTORY="/data/secondary/"
FTP_FILE_NAME="core.lst"

I cannot find how to read these variables into my FTP_GET.sh script, I have tried using read but it just echoed the vars and doesn't store them as required.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that 'K Shell' is Korn Shell, and that you are willing to trust the contents of the file, then you can use the dot command '.':

. parameters.txt

This will read and interpret the file in the current shell. The feature has been in Bourne shell since it was first released, and is in the Korn Shell and Bash too. The C Shell equivalent is source, which Bash also treats as a synonym for dot.

If you don't trust the file then you can read the values with read, validate the values, and then use eval to set the variables:

 while read line
 do
     # Check - which is HARD!
     eval $line
 done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much, works like a charm! I was trying to use the . method but didn't have a space. – pharma_joe Jan 19 '11 at 4:33
    
That would cause trouble - it (dot, '.') is a command and its argument list is separate from the command, just as with any other command and its arguments. You were presumably getting an error about 'command .parameters.txt not found'. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 19 '11 at 4:40
    
+1 for eval. With what bash can do, "HARD!" is an understatement if you have to assume that it could be anything bash can understand. – Joe Jan 18 '13 at 7:21

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