Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Disclaimer: I am a complete newbie with C, but I've been playing with it trying to mimic some features of classes. Ok, I know that if I want to go that way I should learn C++, but consider the following a little experiment.

Schreiner, in the book Object-oriented programming with ANSI-C suggests a way to use pointers to get object orientation features in C. I must admit I have only skimmed through the book, but I don't like his approach too much. Basically, he uses pointers to functions in order to arrange that

func(foo);

actually results in calling

foo.methods->func();

where foo.methods is a struct containing pointers to functions. The thing I do not like in this approach is that one has to have the global function foo anyway; that is, methods are not namespaced by the class they live in. My feeling is that this will soon lead to clutter: think two objects foo and bar, both having a method func but with a different number of parameters.

So I have tried to get something more fit to my taste. A first attempt is the following (I omit the declarations for sake of brevity)

#include <stdio.h>

//Instances of this struct will be my objects
struct foo {
    //Properties
    int bar;

    //Methods
    void (* print)(struct foo self);
    void (* printSum)(struct foo self, int delta);
};

//Here is the actual implementation of the methods
static void printFoo(struct foo self) {
    printf("This is bar: %d\n", self.bar);
}

static void printSumFoo(struct foo self, int delta) {
    printf("This is bar plus delta: %d\n", self.bar + delta);
}

//This is a sort of constructor
struct foo Foo(int bar) {
    struct foo foo = {
        .bar = bar,
        .print = &printFoo,
        .printSum = &printSumFoo
    };
    return foo;
}

//Finally, this is how one calls the methods
void
main(void) {
    struct foo foo = Foo(14);
    foo.print(foo); // This is bar: 14
    foo.printSum(foo, 2); // This is bar plus delta: 16
}

This is unconvenient but sort of works. What I do not like, though, is that you have to explicitly add the object itself as the first argument. With some preprocessor work I can do a little better:

#include <stdio.h>
#define __(stuff)     stuff.method(* stuff.object)

//Instances of this struct will be my objects
struct foo {
    //Properties
    int bar;

    //Methods
    //Note: these are now struct themselves
    //and they contain a pointer the object...
    struct {
        void (* method)(struct foo self);
        struct foo * object;
    } print;
};

//Here is the actual implementation of the methods
static void printFoo(struct foo self) {
    printf("This is bar: %d\n", self.bar);
}

//This is a sort of constructor
struct foo Foo(int bar) {
    struct foo foo = {
        .bar = bar,
        //...hence initialization is a little bit different
        .print = {
            .method = &printFoo,
            .object = &foo
        }
    };
    return foo;
}

//Finally, this is how one calls the methods
void
main(void) {
    struct foo foo = Foo(14);
    //This is long and unconvenient...
    foo.print.method(* foo.print.object); // This is bar: 14
    //...but it can be shortened by the preprocessor
    __(foo.print); // This is bar: 14
}

This is as far as I can get. The problem here is that it will not work for methods with arguments, as preprocessor macros cannot take a variable number of arguments. Of course one can define macros _0, _1 and so on according to the number of arguments (until one gets tired), but this is hardly a good approach.

Is there any way to improve on this and let C use a more object-oriented syntax?

I should add that actually Schreiner does much more than what I said in his book, but I think the basic construction does not change.

share|improve this question
    
I would use a vtable approach for functions, which is similar to your second approach, except print would be a pointer. –  leppie Jan 19 '11 at 9:12
    
"both having a method func"... func is the name of a pointer-to-function field in a struct: there's no reason the global function it points to must be called simply "func". Prefix/postfix it with something class-specific and you've solved that problem. –  Tony D Jan 19 '11 at 9:13
2  
Preprocessor macros can take a variable number of arguments, as of 12 years ago. –  R.. Jan 19 '11 at 9:16
    
C99 allows variadic macro. I agree with R.. –  Nyan Jan 19 '11 at 10:22
    
@Tony: Ok, I agree that one can do manual namespacing, like fooFunc, but it is still less than ideal. –  Andrea Jan 19 '11 at 11:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Various frameworks already exists. See for instance http://ldeniau.web.cern.ch/ldeniau/html/oopc.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this looks very interesting. I will have a look at the source to see how this works. –  Andrea Jan 19 '11 at 11:15
    
500 - Internal server error There was an error loading the page you requested: ldeniau.web.cern.ch/ldeniau/html/oopc.html — There is a problem with the resource you are looking for, and it cannot be displayed. –  lpapp Sep 6 '13 at 11:09
    
@LaszloPapp, Laurent had papers (you can find one or two by looking for its name) and several frameworks linked from his home page. It looks like one of his frameworks is available at sourceforge.net/projects/cos (there is also a githup project which seems inactive). –  AProgrammer Sep 6 '13 at 11:18
    
Yes, I found those. I meant to indicate that you should perhaps update your reply. –  lpapp Sep 6 '13 at 11:39

A book (in PDF form) that explains how to do it, is object oriented programming in ANSI C It's old (1993) but still contains some valid ideas and tips, IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this is the book I refer to, but I don't like its approach too much. See the question. –  Andrea Jan 19 '11 at 11:07
    
OK, I did not see the reference at first! –  Henno Brandsma Jan 21 '11 at 7:56

Did you have a look at Google's Go? It's basically a modernized C where things are done somewhat in the way you suggested. It has parameter polymorphisms. So you don't have to do this:

static void printFoo(struct foo self) {
    printf("This is bar: %d\n", self.bar);
}

In Go it can be done this way:

static void print(Foo self) {
    printf("This is foo: %d\n", self.foo);
}

static void print(Bar self) {
    printf("This is bar: %d\n", self.bar);
}

In Go Foo and Bar would also be structs. So you are basically on the samet track as the Go language designers.

For an overview of Go see http://golang.org/doc/effective_go.html This is the Go main language description: http://golang.org/doc/effective_go.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.