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suppose I have the following class and want to set a conditional breakpoint on arg==null at the marked location. This won't work in eclipse and gives the error "conditional breakpoint has compilation error(s). Reason: arg cannot be resolved to a variable".

I found some related information here, but even if I change the condition to "val$arg==null" (val$arg is the variable name displayed in the debugger's variable view), eclipse gives me the same error.

public abstract class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test t1 = foo("123");
        Test t2 = foo(null);
        t1.bar();
        t2.bar();
    }

    abstract void bar();

    static Test foo(final String arg) {
        return new Test() {
            @Override 
                void bar() {
                // I want to set a breakpoint here with the condition "arg==null"
                System.out.println(arg); 
            }
        };
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could try placing the argument as a field in the local class.

static Test foo(final String arg) {
    return new Test() {
        private final String localArg = arg;
        @Override 
            void bar() {
            // I want to set a breakpoint here with the condition "arg==null"
            System.out.println(localArg); 
        }
    };
}
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I can only offer an ugly workaround:

if (arg == null) {
     int foo = 0; // add breakpoint here
}
System.out.println(arg);
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1  
conditional breakpoints kill performance, so the workaround is not that ugly in my eyes... –  Andreas_D Jan 19 '11 at 9:41
    
I often use Thread.yield() as a breakpoint because I have a check which scans for this code to make sure its not released. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 19 '11 at 9:46
    
This is not always an option (ie when the class is defined in a separate Jar file), and you'd have to change the code back after debugging. As a workaround, I often change the code like this (and leave it in): String myArg = arg; System.out.println(myArg); –  Axel Jan 19 '11 at 10:00
    
@Peter, could you elaborate on "make sure it is not released"? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 19 '11 at 10:26
    
@Axel, lots of print statements is a nuisance when running in a debug console. Could you use a logger instead? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 19 '11 at 10:27

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