Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I read the article Abstract Factory, Template Style by Jim Hyslop and Herb Sutter. This factory is implemented as a Singleton. They provided an easy way to register classes automatically with the RegisterInFactory helper class.

Now i've read several times that Singletons should be avoided, some even consider them as Anti-Patterns and that there are just a few cases where they are usefull. Is this one of them? Or is there an alternative approach which provides such an easy way to autoregister classes?

share|improve this question
    
I'm curious to know where from you refer that "Singletons should be avoided"... –  YeenFei Jan 19 '11 at 10:14
    
"Singletons should be avoided" just like global variables. An Abstract Factory is more like a global service. After initialisation (Registration) all clients only read from it (ask for objects). I think the Abstract Factory is one of the cases where a Singleton is usefull. –  hansmaad Jan 19 '11 at 10:26
    
1  
@hansmaad: sounds to me like one of the cases where globals are useful. I see no reason why it'd be beneficial to make it a singleton as well. –  jalf Jan 19 '11 at 16:12
1  
@YeenFei: jalf.dk/blog/2010/03/… for example. Of course, if you google "singletonitis" or "singleton antipattern" or "singletons considered harmful", you'll find dozens more. –  jalf Jan 19 '11 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

As ever for this sort of subject, there is no answer that applies to every problems. Some said that singleton should be avoided when they are used as an access to a service. It is a use that is akin to the use of global variables. This way you mask the fact that you use service X in your implementation :

// in header
class MyUsefulClass
{
    public:
    void doSomethingUseful();
};

// in .cpp
MyUsefulClass::doSomethingUseful()
{
    // ...
    MyWonderfulService::instance().doService1();
    // ...
    MyWonderfulService::instance().doService2();
}

You create a coupling with MyWonderfulService that the users of your class can not guess. Moreover, You can not easily test your useful class with a mock service ...

That's why I usually prefer dependancy inversion :

// in header
class MyUsefulClass
{
    public:
    void setServiceToUse(MyService&);
    void doSomethingUseful();

    // [...]
};

// in .cpp
MyUsefulClass::doSomethingUseful()
{
    // ...
    _myService->doService1();
    // ...
    _myService->doService2();
}

This way is usually considered better as the coupling between class is lighter. Nevertheless, for some services, which are well known to be of widespread use in a framework, it is simplier to use a singleton. It makes sense for a single service that is the service which give you access to all other services in a framework for example ^^ It is often use for technical services like logging for instance.

my2c

Edit: I read the article, as the focus is on AbstractFactories, the use of a singleton is a casual one, not a design decision. It is understandable in an article in which you do not want to write things that will not get you to your point.

share|improve this answer
    
So to have the autoregistration as shown in the article i need the global access but i don't need it to be the only instance. An alternative would therefore be to provide it as a global like std::cout which alows me to use it, but doen't prevent me from using a second one if needed. Or is there a third way, maybe superior way to achieve this autoregistration? –  P3trus Jan 19 '11 at 11:45
    
@p3trus: I will add a concrete example in my answer when I have time ... Just try a global for now. I personnaly use depandancy inversion everytime ... –  neuro Jan 21 '11 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.