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I have two shared global variables

int a = 0;
int b = 0;

and two threads

// thread 1
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    EnterCriticalSection(&sect);
    a++;
    b++;
    std::cout << a " " << b << std::endl;
    LeaveCriticalSection(&sect);
}

// thread2
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    EnterCriticalSection(&sect);
    a--;
    b--;
    std::cout << a " " << b << std::endl;
    LeaveCriticalSection(&sect);
}

The code always prints the following output

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

6 6

7 7

8 8

9 9

10 10

9 9

8 8

7 7

6 6

5 5

4 4

3 3

2 2

1 1

0 0

That is quite strange, looks like threads are working sequentally.. What's the problem with that?

Thanks.

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2  
why do you think its strange? by the time you start the second thread, first thread might have finished its job. –  Naveen Jan 19 '11 at 10:06
    
Yes, actually it is possible, but the same output is with larger amount of data too and with another mutex object (for example std::mutex) it works like exptected. –  ledokol Jan 19 '11 at 10:09
    
Just tested with 10000 increments/decrements. Yes, you are right, that was the reason, but it works strange anyway, looks like it doesn't give approximately equal time to both threads..the difference is huge, I can see it increments values for more then a second.. –  ledokol Jan 19 '11 at 10:11
    
BTW, as a side note if you are using C++ (as tag suggests) its better to use CCriticalSection along with CSingleLock so that you have exception safety. –  Naveen Jan 19 '11 at 10:31
    
@Naveen: Not all C++ code uses MFC (thank god!). :) –  Leo Davidson Jan 19 '11 at 12:17
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3 Answers

For me it looks like the topic discussed in http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/windowssdk/thread/980e5018-3ade-4823-a6dc-5ddbcc3091d5/ Please look the example from June 28, 2006

(unfortunately I cannot find the original article by Microsoft telling about the change of CriticalSection)

Could you try your code on Windows XP? What does it show?

I guess that I/O operations (cout) affect the scheduling similarly to a Sleep() call, so starting with Windows Vista a thread could cause starvation of other threads when doing I/O inside a CS.

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IMO critical section leave/enter in your example is so fast that another thread is not fast enough to execute enter section during this moment.

Try to put some (maybe random) sleeps to slow down code to see desired effects.

Note: Default timeout for EnterCriticalSection is like 30 days or so (means infinty) so you cannot expect that function will time out. And documentation says:

There is no guarantee about the order in which threads will obtain ownership of the critical section, however, the system will be fair to all threads.

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That's what I think too and that's exactly my concern. If so then critical section doesn't satisfy mutual exclusion essential criteria - bounded waiting. –  ledokol Jan 19 '11 at 10:18
2  
I think its perfectly correct behaviour - IMO critical section is for ensuring that "shared resource" is accessed properly. Just imagine that you have bunch of threads of various priority and they are fighting for resource. You may need some kind of queue for your (not fully described) problem. –  Jiri Jan 19 '11 at 10:28
    
I have just read about bounded waiting - and yes, you may be right. it seems that this does not meet this criterion. –  Jiri Jan 19 '11 at 10:32
    
@ledokol Where does it say in the documentation that a critical section satisfies bounded waiting? I can't find that part of the documentation yet but MSDN is notoriously hard to search. –  David Heffernan Jan 19 '11 at 12:32
1  
I'm pretty sure that as of Vista, critical sections are not fair. If there's no contention on a critical section, the current threads quantum isn't released and the thread will continue to run. –  Larry Osterman Jan 19 '11 at 14:31
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Each thread has a specific time slice during which it executes before being preempted. In your example, the time slice seems to be longer than the time required to complete the loop.

However, you can actively yield control by calling Sleep(0) after leaving the critical section inside the loop.

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I'm using 2 core computer and each thred run really parallel, that is not a context switch issue. –  ledokol Jan 19 '11 at 10:13
3  
Well yes, it is. Even on two cores, one thread can complete before the other one starts. Furthermore, the system may or may not schedule the two threads on the same core. Remember, there are hundreds of other threads out there, from other processes... –  Daniel Gehriger Jan 19 '11 at 10:16
    
OK, maybe that's how it should work. You really can't say, the system does so many things, I just want to ensure that it's not the problem mentioned by Jiri. Does critical section satisfies bounded waiting criteria? –  ledokol Jan 19 '11 at 10:21
    
Don't worry. When you leave the critical section, entering it is equally possible on any thread. Then one that just left it will not be favored by the system in any way (and actually, calling LeaveCriticalSection() isn't that fast -- after all, it's a system call). But leaving the critical section isn't a cause for a context switch either. Did you actually try adding a Sleep(0) just after leaving? What's the result? –  Daniel Gehriger Jan 19 '11 at 10:26
2  
Sleep(0) is not a proper way to yield. blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2005/10/04/476847.aspx –  Chris Becke Jan 19 '11 at 12:26
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